discredit

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discredit

noun animadversion, aspersion, attaint, baseness, castigation, censure, condemnation, contumely, criticism, debasement, dedecus, degradation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval, disbelief, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disparagement, dispraise, disreputability, disrepute, distrust, ignominia, impaired reputation, imputation, incredulity, infamy, ingloriousness, lack of confidence, lack of esseem, loss of belief, loss of credence, loss of credit, loss of repute, mistrust, odium, opprobrium, probrum, reflection, remonstrance, reprehension, reproach, reprobation, revilement, scandal, shame, slur, stain, stigma, stricture, taint, tarnish, turpitude
Associated concepts: discredit a witness

discredit

verb abrogare, asperse, besmirch, brand, bring disgrace upon, bring into disfavor, bring reproach upon, cast aspersions on, cast shame upon, debase, decry, degrade, denigrate, deprecate, depreciate, deprive of credit, derogate from, discount, disgrace, disparage, downgrade, hold up to shame, impair the reputation of, impute shame to, injure the credit of, involvein shame, make distasteful, malign, reflect dishonor upon, reprehend, scandalize, stain, stigmatize, taint, tarnish
Associated concepts: discredit a witness, discredited witness
See also: accuse, attaint, bad character, bad repute, blame, brand, cavil, cite, condemn, condemnation, contemn, debase, decry, defame, degradation, demean, denounce, deprecate, depreciate, derogate, disaccord, disallow, disapprove, disavow, disbelieve, discommend, discount, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disparage, disprove, doubt, humiliate, ignominy, impeach, impeachability, impugn, incredulity, infamy, lessen, libel, negate, notoriety, obloquy, onus, opprobrium, pillory, refuse, refute, reject, reproach, scandal, shame, smear, stain, stigma, sully, suspicion, tarnish, underestimate

TO DISCREDIT, practice, evidence. To deprive one of credit or confidence.
     2. In general, a party may discredit a witness called by the opposite party, who testifies against him, by proving that his character is such as not to entitle him to credit or confidence, or any other fact which shows he is not, entitled to belief. It is clearly settled, also, that the party voluntarily calling a witness, cannot afterwards impeach his character for truth and veracity. 1 Moo. & Rob. 414; 3 B. & Cress. 746; S. C. 10 Eng. Com. Law R. 220. But if a party calls a witness, who turns out unfavorable, he may call another to prove the same point. 2 Campb. R. 556 2 Stark. R. 334; S. C. 3 E. C. L. R. 371 1 Nev & Man. 34; 4 B. & Adolph. 193; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 47; 1 Phil. Ev. 229; Rosc. Civ. Ev. 96.

References in classic literature ?
However this may discredit such persons with the judicious, it helps them with the people, as it gives heat, pungency, and publicity to their words.
Having long discredited the old systems of mysticism, he now began to discredit the old appraisements of morality.
How could you help regarding as an incumbrance and a discredit to you an idle dragooning chap who was an incumbrance and a discredit to himself, excepting under discipline?
Thorpe, for she not only longed to be dancing, but was likewise aware that, as the real dignity of her situation could not be known, she was sharing with the scores of other young ladies still sitting down all the discredit of wanting a partner.
Samuel Ferguson, one of her most glorious sons, will not reflect discredit on his origin.
There is a singular fascination in watching the eagerness with which the learned author ferrets out every circumstance which may throw discredit on his hero.
He reflected, with much probability on his side, that Lydgate would by-and-by be caught tripping too, and that his ungentlemanly attempts to discredit the sale of drugs by his professional brethren, would by-and-by recoil on himself.
If he was starving tomorrow he would be the last man in England to make away with himself--he is too great a wretch--he is too vicious--he is too lost to all sense of respectability--he is too much of a discredit to his family.
When he found that he had only attained capture and discredit, the sealed bomb in his brain burst, and he broke his own sword and hanged himself.
A treacherous friend is the most dangerous enemy; and I will say boldly, that both religion and virtue have received more real discredit from hypocrites than the wittiest profligates or infidels could ever cast upon them: nay, farther, as these two, in their purity, are rightly called the bands of civil society, and are indeed the greatest of blessings; so when poisoned and corrupted with fraud, pretence, and affectation, they have become the worst of civil curses, and have enabled men to perpetrate the most cruel mischiefs to their own species.