dishonor

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Dishonor

To refuse to accept or pay a draft or to pay a promissory note when duly presented. An instrument is dishonored when a necessary or optional presentment is made and due acceptance or payment is refused, or cannot be obtained within the prescribed time, or in case of bank collections, the instrument is seasonably returned by the midnight deadline; or presentment is excused and the instrument is not duly accepted or paid. Includes the insurer of a letter of credit refusing to pay or accept a draft or demand for payment.

As respects the flag, to deface or defile, imputing a lively sense of shaming or an equivalent acquiescent callousness.

dishonor

v. to refuse to pay the face amount of a check or the amount due on a promissory note.

dishonor

(Nonpayment), noun breach of faith, breach of promise, declination, default, delinquency, failure, improbity, inability to pay, inattention, insolvency, nonacceptance, nonadherence, noncompliance, nonfeasance, nonfulfillment, nonobservance, nonpayment at maturity, omission, refusal to accept, refusal to pay, rejection, repudiation of payment
Associated concepts: dishonor of checks, dishonor of negooiated instruments, notice of dishonor

dishonor

(Shame), noun abasement, abjection, aspersion, attaint, bad character, bad favor, bad name, bad reputation, bad repute, badge of infamy, blemish, blot, brand, calumny, contempt, contumely, debasement, decrial, defamation, defilement, degradation, depravity, derogation, detraction, deviation from rectitude, disapprobation, discredit, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace, disparagement, disreputability, disrepute, disrespect, ignobility, ignominia, ignominy, ill-fame, ill-favor, ill-repute, improbity, imputation, indignity, infamia, infamy, ingloriousness, lack of conscience, lack of honor, lack of principle, lack of probity, loss of reputation, low estimation, mockery, no repute, no standing, notoriety, obloquy, opprobrium, outrage, public disgrace, reproach, ridicule, scandal, scorn, shamefulness, slur, smear, stain, stigma, taint, tarnish, tarnished honor, traducement, turpitude, turpitudo, vileness, vilification, wickedness

dishonor

(Deprive of honor), verb abase, asperse, attaint, besmear, besmirch, blot, brand, bring into discredit, bring shame upon, cast a slur on, cast aspersions, cast reproachupon, contemn, debase, debauch, dedecorare, defame, deflower, degrade, dehonestare, denigrate, denounce, deride, desecrate, despise, discredit, disgrace, disparage, malign, pillory, reflect discredit upon, reproach, slur, smear, smirch, speak ill of, stain, stigmatize, stuprare, taint, tarnish, vilify

dishonor

(Refuse to pay), verb decline to pay, deeline to redeem, disallow payment, disregard, evade, not observe, not pay, refuse payment, refuse to honor, stop payment, withhold payment
Associated concepts: dishonor a check, notice of dishonor
See also: abuse, aspersion, attaint, bad character, bad faith, bad repute, brand, browbeat, condemn, contemn, contumely, corruption, debase, defame, default, defilement, degradation, demean, denigrate, denounce, derogate, discredit, disfavor, disgrace, dishonesty, disoblige, disparage, disparagement, disregard, disrepute, disrespect, fail, humiliate, ignominy, impeachability, infamy, infidelity, lose, malign, nonpayment, notoriety, obloquy, odium, onus, opprobrium, pillory, pollute, reproach, repudiate, scandal, shame, smear, stain, stigma, sully, tarnish, violate

TO DISHONOR, contr. This term is applied to the nonfulfillment of commercial engagements. To dishonor a bill of exchange, or a promissory note, is to refuse or neglect to pay it at maturity.
     2. The holder is bound to give notice to the parties to such instrument of its dishonor, and his laches will discharge the indorsers. Chit. on Bills, 394, 395, 256 to 278.

References in classic literature ?
she said, with compassion in her tone, for she had immediately reflected that the dishonour must be felt still more keenly by her husband.
For hee who tempts, though in vain, at least asperses The tempted with dishonour foul, suppos'd Not incorruptible of Faith, not prooff Against temptation: thou thy self with scorne And anger wouldst resent the offer'd wrong, Though ineffectual found: misdeem not then, If such affront I labour to avert From thee alone, which on us both at once The Enemie, though bold, will hardly dare, Or daring, first on mee th' assault shall light.
but my grandsire drew a good long bow at Hastings, and I trust not to dishonour his memory.
Bethink thee thou art working against thyself, plotting thine own dishonour, devising thine own ruin.
It is my dishonour that has made you so dear to me.
Lovell Mingott had been telegraphed for, and messages were being despatched by hand to the members of the family living in New York; and meanwhile there was nothing to do but to discuss in hushed tones the consequences of Beaufort's dishonour and of his wife's unjustifiable action.
These, then, are the situations in which men will be seditious: the causes for which they will be so are profit and honour; and their contrary: for, to avoid dishonour or loss of fortune by mulcts, either on their own account or their friends, they will raise a commotion in the state.
He could not understand how he had submitted to the dishonour of such a love; and when he thought of Mildred it was with angry hatred, because she had submitted him to so much humiliation.
And then he must needs have me down in the country, to lead the life of a nun, lest I should dishonour him or bring him to ruin; as if he had not been ten times worse every way, with his betting-book, and his gaming-table, and his opera-girls, and his Lady This and Mrs.
But besides the dishonour which is thus cast on one of the most useful as well as entertaining of all kinds of writing, there is just reason to apprehend, that by encouraging such authors we shall propagate much dishonour of another kind; I mean to the characters of many good and valuable members of society; for the dullest writers, no more than the dullest companions, are always inoffensive.
Perhaps, if the dishonour had been done to her, but it was done long before her day.
She had told Darzac that if her father should know of her dishonour, she would kill herself.