disinherit


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Disinherit

To cut off from an inheritance. To deprive someone, who would otherwise be an heir to property or another right, of his or her right to inherit.

A parent who wishes to disinherit a child may specifically state so in a will.

disinherit

v. to intentionally take actions to guarantee that a person who would normally inherit upon a party's death (wife, child or closest relative) would get nothing. Usually this is done by a provision in a will or codicil (amendment) to a will which states that a specific person is not to take ("my son, Robert Hands, shall receive nothing," "no descendant of my hated brother shall take anything on account of my death.") It is not enough to merely ignore or not mention a child in a will since he/she may become a "pretermitted heir" (a child apparently forgotten.) A spouse can be disinherited only to the extent that the state law allows. A writer of a will can also disinherit anyone who challenges the validity of the will in what is called an "in terrorem" clause, which might say "I leave anyone who challenges this will or any part of it one dollar." (See: heir, pretermitted heir, will, codicil, descent, descent and distribution)

disinherit

verb abandon, abrogate, annul, cast out, cut off, cut off from inheritance, cut out of one's will, deprive of hereditary succession, disaffirm, discard, disclaim, disendow, disentitle, disherit, disown, dispossess of hereditary right, divest, exclude from inheritance, forfeit, forsake, nullify, oust, quash, recall, recant, renounce, replace, repudiate, rescind, retract, revoke, take away from, turn out, withdraw, withhold
Associated concepts: disinherit a husband, disinherit a wife, disinherit an adopted child, disinherit pretermitted children
See also: adeem, confiscate, deprive, disown, reject

disinherit

to deprive an heir or next of kin of inheritance or right to inherit. In some systems the testator may be restricted in the exercise of this right as in Scotland; see LEGITIM.
References in periodicals archive ?
In British Columbia, it is possible for a parent to disinherit an adult independent child.
For example, though the will expressly provides for one child and disinherits spouses, the will confusingly refers to children and tax deductions for spouses:
American law is unique in how little it cares to protect children against disinheritance--or, put differently, in how strongly it values the parent's right to disinherit the child.
This situation is a cautionary tale to anyone who wishes to disinherit their next of kin or leave assets to them in unequal shares.
The Queen threatening to disinherit her son if the marriage goes ahead is set at 100-1.
Lear decides to divide his kingdom between the two daughters who publicly profess their love for him, and disinherit Cordelia, who tells the truth.
Now Marchand faces a terrible choice: As a white man married to a woman of color, he is expected to renounce his wife (or demote her to his mistress), disinherit their children, and make an advantageous marriage to a socially prominent New Orleans heiress.
Mark Parker had argued that to disinherit a son was not the ordinary act of a rational testator, but Mr Justice Lindsay said, 'The blunt answer to that is that Mark's letter was not an ordinary letter for a son to write his widowed mother.
Anyone knows if they want to challenge the will, they better succeed because if they fail, they are going to disinherit themselves completely,'' said lawyer Andrew Garb.
A revocable trust may be appropriate when an individual wishes to quietly disinherit a particular family member.
In a play rammed full of evil characters to loathe, my favourite was Matthew Rhys as the illegitimate Edmund who not only plots to disinherit his legitimate brother, but also plays the cad who declares "undying love" to both sisters.