disinherit

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Disinherit

To cut off from an inheritance. To deprive someone, who would otherwise be an heir to property or another right, of his or her right to inherit.

A parent who wishes to disinherit a child may specifically state so in a will.

disinherit

v. to intentionally take actions to guarantee that a person who would normally inherit upon a party's death (wife, child or closest relative) would get nothing. Usually this is done by a provision in a will or codicil (amendment) to a will which states that a specific person is not to take ("my son, Robert Hands, shall receive nothing," "no descendant of my hated brother shall take anything on account of my death.") It is not enough to merely ignore or not mention a child in a will since he/she may become a "pretermitted heir" (a child apparently forgotten.) A spouse can be disinherited only to the extent that the state law allows. A writer of a will can also disinherit anyone who challenges the validity of the will in what is called an "in terrorem" clause, which might say "I leave anyone who challenges this will or any part of it one dollar." (See: heir, pretermitted heir, will, codicil, descent, descent and distribution)

disinherit

verb abandon, abrogate, annul, cast out, cut off, cut off from inheritance, cut out of one's will, deprive of hereditary succession, disaffirm, discard, disclaim, disendow, disentitle, disherit, disown, dispossess of hereditary right, divest, exclude from inheritance, forfeit, forsake, nullify, oust, quash, recall, recant, renounce, replace, repudiate, rescind, retract, revoke, take away from, turn out, withdraw, withhold
Associated concepts: disinherit a husband, disinherit a wife, disinherit an adopted child, disinherit pretermitted children
See also: adeem, confiscate, deprive, disown, reject

disinherit

to deprive an heir or next of kin of inheritance or right to inherit. In some systems the testator may be restricted in the exercise of this right as in Scotland; see LEGITIM.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal and again held that the testator's reasons for disinheriting the child need not be justifiable.
These persons interview the testator about his condition, the contents of his will, and his reasons for disinheriting his "natural objects.
Tragic conditions in Shakespeare; disinheriting the Globe.