disjunctive

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It cited cases in which the Supreme Court decided it was necessary to read the word "and" disjunctively to realize Congress's intent.
1989) ("knowledge or consent' as that term is used in the statute is to be read disjunctively under normal canons of statutory construction") (quoting 171-02 Liberty Ave.
In other words, TEI recommends that a time-based de minimis rule be stated disjunctively.
The defendants argued that the instruction incorrectly defined extortion disjunctively, i.
that ultimate principle by which the many, which are the universe disjunctively, become the one actual occasion, which is the universe conjunctively.
1 and proposed by Ralli (1997, 1998, 1999), the content of an attribute may contain values disjunctively specified.
It is that ultimate principle by which the many, which are the universe disjunctively, become the one actual occasion, which is the universe conjunctively.
In fact, her words recall for me a discussion of Hans Belting's Art History After Modernism (2003), which we published in my first issue as editor, some seven years ago: "Art history," our reviewer observed, "must be defined so disjunctively that it often isn't clear whether there is anything on which feminists, poststructuralists, social historians of art, queer theorists, iconographers, connoisseurs, and so on might agree such that their disagreements could offer a productive exchange.
Finally, aspects of standardisation are considered against the background of reuse, of sharing of resources, and of possible adaptation for use by other disjunctively written South African Bantu languages.
count conjunctively, rather than disjunctively, as long as each act is
Instead of the entropic stalemate of Robert Smithson's embedded mirrors, or even the seamless gloss of more recent reflective art like that of Anish Kapoor or Jeff Koons, here the effect is not unlike that of a latter-day stereoscope, in which localized pockets of corporeal space are disjunctively aggregated with no coherent spatial continuum to connect them.
If, indeed, confused knowledge, conditioned knowledge, or disjunctive knowledge effects or quasi-effects nothing on the part of its objects, but only extrinsically denominates an object as confusedly, conditionally, or disjunctively known, why in the same way will not a knowledge which fabricates its object denominate it (only extrinsically) as fabricated?