disparage


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He appealed, arguing that the may disparage provision was an unconstitutional restraint on free speech.
In connection with recent events we would like to reiterate that India has always strongly condemned all acts that disparage religious beliefs and hurt religious sentiments.
But the way to resolve them is not to disparage the doubters.
Evans publishes extensive excerpts from an anonymously-authored life of Sutton that set out to refute this supposition on the doubtful grounds that "'Ben understood well enough that his mushroome playes could never disparage or out-last mr Suttons .
Although commuters often disparage the HOV lanes, transportation planners see them as key to moving more motorists on increasingly packed Southern California freeways.
The Ninth Amendment of the Bill of Rights states: "The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people?
Infidel" means, simply put, your religion is the wrong one; Christians used the word in the Middle Ages to disparage Muslims and, occasionally, Jews.
The filing of multiple unfair labor practice allegations in order to harass and disparage a company is standard practice in Union Corporate Campaigns.
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall all not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.
Murray officials refused to give Snyder time to speak, arguing that his prayer was political in nature and designed to disparage other faiths.
The author insists, however, that in spite of Erasmus' preference for the spirit he did not intend to disparage the letter.