disquisition


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In all three chapters, the author's disquisition on Jungian theory shifts the focus away from a cinematic analysis of the films' formal aspects and from the political implications of their narratives.
There are a few dabs of sophistication -- the witty, walrussy presence of Stephen Fry as Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock's brother; a disquisition on Schubert's great lieder and a morsel of Mozart's Don Giovanni -- but these feel random and perfunctory.
A disquisition on algebraic topics accompanies "The Archimedes Principle (1984)," the chapter about Michela's disappearance; and an explanation of the prime numbers, especially the twin primes, occurs in the chapter "In and Out of the Water (1998)": "Mattia thought that he and Alice were like that, twin primes, alone and lost, close but not close enough to really touch each other.
Lex Charitatis: A Juristic Disquisition on Law in the Theology of Martin Luther By Johannes Heckel.
In skillfully negotiating a broad array of life stories--some written and published by young women, others composed at the end of a long life; some introspective and self-analytical, others anecdotal and unrevealing of the writer's inner life; some by authors who rejected their society's expectations for women, others who dutifully played by the rules--Prenshaw offers a learned but readable disquisition that merges an analysis of Southernness and the South, changing women's lives, and the challenges of autobiography as a literary genre.
Pteros Tactics, his latest work, was spurred by Canadian scholar Anne Carson's disquisition on the ancient Greek concept of "eros," the sensual longing part of what we mean by the grab-all word "love.
Wilson deftly connects Borges's job as a reviewer and his almost fatal accident of 1938 with the development of the fictional form that would catapult him to fame in the 1960s: the puzzling mixture of fake review, fantastic tale, and metaphysical disquisition that first appeared in Historia universal de la infamia and later crystallized in Ficciones.
On one level, this produces a brilliant disquisition on the musician angel, which includes a marvellous quotation from Johannes Tinctoris, a Netherlandish musician who served as chaplain at the Aragonese court in Naples between 1471 and 1475: 'When the painter wants to depict the bliss of the saved, he paints angels which make various instruments ring out.
In a marvellous sociology of labour law, Smith and Morton continue their long standing disquisition of the use of law by Labour to shape a neoliberal legal tunnel for trade unions: to 'contain and domesticate', underpinned by the 'decay and dilution of EU directives' (p.
Poor old Paul's subtle disquisition on love, for example, by which he meant agape or caritas--unqualified care for another, not romantic love--is invoked off-point at weddings almost as often as Shakespeare's Sonnet 116, whose speaker admits impediments to the marriage of true minds in the very act of denying them.
The upshot of this disquisition is that if we thought it was tough to keep up yesterday, tomorrow may be a greater trial.
Because those are the alternatives, I'll offer Obama a suggestion: When Wright first came up in March, Obama delivered a 5,000-word disquisition on race that thrilled the kind of people who like 5,000-word disquisitions (who aren't, as it turned out, average Democratic Pennsylvania voters).