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Specifically, the Australian Federal Police have used the provision to disrupt access to domains on the INTERPOL 'worst of' list of child exploitation material.
DISRUPT PAD III will study use of the Shockwave Medical Lithoplasty System in combination with drug coated balloon therapy to assess short- and long-term outcomes compared to those achievable using traditional balloon angioplasty prior to DCB in a calcified patient population.
It also says teachers can restrain youngsters who are hurting, or at risk of hurting, someone by accident, or if a pupil absconds from class, or detention - if that would put the pupil in danger or disrupt classes.
It is known that ozone and its reaction products can cross the blood-gas barrier and enter the bloodstream, and exposure to ozone can cause oxidative stress, which has been shown to disrupt testicular and sperm function.
When an invasive species disrupts and dominates a food chain, it can siphon food energy away from other organisms in the chain.
There it ramps up heart rate and blood pressure and disrupts the brain's ability to regulate body temperature.
The researchers recommend further pesticide testing to find which chemicals disrupt natural nitrogen fixing, so that farmers will have the opportunity to avoid them.
In addition to interrupting power transmission, disturbances caused by solar activity can disrupt ground-to-ground wireless communications, satellites and spacecraft.
Developing investigative strategies to disrupt and dismantle these criminal enterprises requires a familiarity with group structures and an understanding of the backgrounds of the individuals who form the organizations.
Such substances have drawn attention in Japan since they are said to disrupt the reproductive ability of animals.
The pressure should also disrupt the rhythm and timing of the passing game by attacking the launch point.
A growing body of scientific evidence points to the ability of a variety of industrial and agricultural chemicals to disrupt normal hormone function in both wildlife and humans -- a phenomenon referred to as hormone disruption.