dogma

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dogma

noun article of faith, axiom, belief, canon, conviction, credendum, credo, creed, declaration of faith, dictum, doctrinaire opinion, doctrine, dogma, doxy, maxim, orthodoxy, persuasion, placitum, precept, professed belief, rule, tenet
See also: article, belief, conviction, doctrine, idea, persuasion, precept, principle, rule, theory, thesis

DOGMA, civil law. This word is used in the first chapter, first section, of the second Novel, and signifies an ordinance of the senate. See also Dig. 27, 1, 6.

References in periodicals archive ?
Modern mercantilism is a modification of the classical version in that it strikes a balance between the market and the state, self-reliance and economic interdependence, and political dogmatism and economic pragmatism (Jackson and Sorensen 2007:208).
Although there is a lack of studies examining the influence of demographic and socio-psychological variables on consumer animosity, this study builds on previous research, namely concerning the influence of conservatism, dogmatism and world-mindedness on Jordanian consumer animosity.
Religious dogmatism is the only dogmatism that gives someone a rationale not only to kill themselves and kill others but to celebrate the deaths of their children.
Dogmatism of either kind is unlikely to involve itself with such propositions, and the Pyrrhonian, whose philosophy is useful only in a conflict with dogmatism, is at a loss to do anything with such propositions other than to accept them.
other challenges are lack of relevant or compliant skills, fear, bias, dogmatism, and ageism.
On the one hand, Don Quijote's dogmatism drives him from one adventure to the next, which gives continuity to the narration, and on the other, the story of Don Quijote is presented as being un-dogmatic.
Secondly, the scant research and dogmatism about antidepressants in bipolar treatment has tended to focus on bipolar I disorder, as Dr.
Unfortunately, the dogmatism of counterinsurgency has eclipsed strategy and, even more troublingly, shapes policy.
Much of it is devoted to 'religioid' movements and trends which neither supporters nor observers would necessarily think of as religious, though it has valid points to make about the dogmatism of the fashionable Dawkins school of applied atheism.
WHAT'S SO WRONG WITH BEING ABSOLUTELY RIGHT: THE DANGEROUS NATURE OF DOGMATIC BELIEF uses traditional and modern personality theories, biopsychology, and social learning theories to discuss dogmatism and its traits.
We do not accept this dogmatism, we want a pluralism of approaches .