character

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Related to dominant character: codominant inheritance, recessive character

character

(An individual), noun being, body, figure, human, human being, man, mortal, party, person, personage, personality, self-determined being, somebody, someone

character

(Personal quality), noun animus, aspects, attribute, bent, characteristic mood, constitution, description, disposition, dominant quality, essence, essential part, essennial quality of one's nature, essentialness, ethos, features, fiber, frame of mind, grain, inclination, individualism, individuality, ingenium, inherited characteristics, inner nature, intellect, intrinsicalness, kind, leaning, makeup, manner, marked traits, mental and spiritual makeup, mettle, mold, moral qualities, mores, natura, natural turn of mind, nature, peculiarity, personal traits, personality, predilection, prime innredients, proclivity, proneness, propension, propensity, psychological habits, qualities, quiddity, quintessence, slant, striking qualities, style, substantiality, susceptibility, temper, temperament, tendency, tone, trait

character

(Reputation), noun celebrity, credit, distinction, eminence, esteem, estimation, existimatio, fama, fame, grandeur, high reward, honor, locus standi, name, nobility, notability, notice, notoriety, notoriousness, opinio, place, popular favor, popularity, position, position in society, preeminence, prestige, prominence, public esteem, publicly recognized standing, recognition, regard, renown, repute, respect, respectability, standing, station, status
Associated concepts: character evidence, character witness
See also: animus, behavior, caliber, color, complexion, condition, configuration, disposition, entity, form, frame, grade, honor, inclination, individual, integrity, kind, merit, part, person, personality, predisposition, principle, property, quality, rectitude, role, speciality, specialty, spirit, state, style, temperament, tendency, tenor, turpitude

CHARACTER, evidence. The opinion generally entertained of a person derived from the common re 'port of the people who are acquainted with him. 3 Serg. & R. 336; 3 Mass. 192; 3 Esp. C. 236.
     2. There are three classes of cases on which the moral character and conduct of a person in society may be used in proof before a jury, each resting upon particular and distinct grounds. Such evidence is admissible, 1st. To afford a presumption that a particular party has not been guilty of a criminal act. 2d. To affect the damages in particular cases, where their amount depends on the character and conduct of any individual; and, 3d. To impeach or confirm the veracity of a witness.
     3.-1. Where the guilt of an accused party is doubtful, and the character of the supposed agent is involved in the question, a presumption of innocence arises from his former conduct in society, as evidenced by his general character, since it is not probable that a person of known probity and humanity, would commit a dishonest or outrageous act in the particular instance. Such presumptions, however, are so remote from fact, and it is frequently so difficult to estimate a person's real character, that they are entitled to little weight, except in doubtful cases. Since the law considers a presumption of this nature to be admissible, it is in principle admissible 'Whenever a reasonable presumption arises from it, as to the fact in question; in practice it is admitted whenever the character of the party is involved in the issue. See 2 St. Tr. 1038 1 Coxes Rep. 424; 5 Serg. & R. 352 3 Bibb, R. 195; 2 Bibb, R. 286; 5 Day, R. 260; 5 Esp. C. 13; 3 Camp. C. 519; 1 Camp. C. 460; Str. R. 925. Tha. Cr. Cas. 230; 5 Port. 382.
     4.-2. In some instances evidence in disparagement of character is admissible, not in order to prove or disprove the commission of a particular fact, but with a view to damages. In actions for criminal conversation with the plaintiff's wife, evidence may be given of the wife's general bad character, for want of chastity, and even of particular acts of adultery committed by her, previous to her intercourse with the defendant. B. N. P. 27, 296; 12 Mod. 232; 3 Esp. C. 236. See 5 Munf. 10. In actions for slander and libel, when the defendant has not justified, evidence of the plaintiff's bad character has also been admitted. 3 Camp. C. 251; 1 M. & S. 284; 2 Esp. C. 720; 2 Nott & M'Cord, 511; 1 Nott & M'Cord, 268; and see 11 Johns. R. 38; 1 Root, R. 449; 1 Johns. R. 46; 6 Penna. St. Rep. 170. The ground of admitting such evidence is, that a person of disparaged fame is not entitled to the same measure of damages with one whose character is unblemished. When, however, the defendant justifies the slander, it seems to be doubtful whether the evidence of reports as to the conduct and character of the plaintiff can be received. See 1 M. & S. 286, n (a) 3 Mass. R. 553 1 Pick. R. 19. When evidence is admitted touching the general character of a party, it is manifest that it is to be confined to matters in reference to the nature of the, charge against him. 2 Wend. 352.
     5.-3. The party against whom a witness is called, may disprove the fact& stated by him, or may examine other witnesses as to his general character; but they will not be allowed to speak of particular facts or parts of his conduct. B. N. P. 296. For example, evidence of the general character of a prosecutrix for a rape, may be given, as that she was a street walker; but evidence of specific acts of criminality cannot be admitted. 3 Carr. & P. 589. The regular mode is to inquire whether the witness under examination has the means of knowing the former witness general character, and whether from such knowledge he would believe, him on his oath. 4 St. Tr. 693; 4 Esp. C. 102. In answer to such evidence against character, the other party may cross-examine the witness as to his means of knowledge, and the grounds of his opinion; or he may attack such witness general character, and by fresh evidence support the character of his own. 2 Stark. C. 151; Id. 241; St. Ev. pt. 4, 1753 to 1758; 1 Phil. Ev. 229. A party cannot give evidence to confirm the good character of a witness, unless his general character has been impugned by his antagonist. 9 Watts, R. 124. See, in general, as to character, Phil. Ev. Index, tit. Character; Stark. Ev. pl. 4, 364 Swift's Ev. 140 to 144 5 Ohio R. 227; Greenl. Ev. Sec. 54; 3 Hill, R. 178 Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
There are two versions which vary in the sex of the dominant character who initiates the conversation, suggests they go to his/her room, and directs the sexual activity (e.
With part two, "The Nineteenth Century and After," the dominant character of European thought became a passionate nationalism with which Erasmus' dispassionate internationalism and passionate pacifism were at odds.
Pennzoil, which came into Indy car racing in 1979 with a "one car, that's all" philosophy, is becoming a dominant character in the Indy 500 drama that has taken center stage this month at the two-and-a-half-mile oval.
He said: "The reason why they were not brought to light sooner was because of your own dominant character and your position in the world of entertainment, which meant that your victims thought that you were untouchable, something that I think you too believed.
Judge Leonard said: "Your own dominant character and your position in the world of entertainment meant your victims thought that you were untouchable, something I think you too believed.
Tries followed at regular intervals as veteran Jon Skurr emerged as the dominant character of the early exchanges.
Like the first film, the majestic lion Aslan (Liam Neeson) is themane attraction of an action-packed second half, plus a fleeting return for another dominant character.
In 2006 the dominant character on the sire scene was Seattle Slew's son A.
Joe is a very dominant character and he thinks Dossa's life is absolute rubbish.
The dominant character in the birth story (Matt 1:18-25) is Joseph.
He was a dominant character who played the game as hard as anyone.