donate


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Donors will stay healthy if they donate blood regularly, he added.
Taxpayers who donate their car are pleased to avoid the hassle and take their deduction.
If they sell the stock, pay the 10% capital gains tax, and donate the remaining $9,200, they can deduct that $9,200, yielding an income tax savings of $1,380 (assuming a 15% tax bracket).
If there is one thing that readers continue to underscore about charitable giving, it is that they donate to organizations supported by their church, family, and friends or to organizations with which they or their children are involved.
Anyone in good health between the ages of 17 and 75 and weighing at least 110 pounds can donate blood.
Also, if you're a highly paid executive with a hefty group life insurance policy, you may want to donate a portion of it to a charitable organization, says lan Quan-Soon, president of the New York City-based IQ Financial Services, The premium your employer pays on group life insurance for policies that exceed $50,000 is considered income to you.
A prospective donor sends a listing of the merchandise it wants to donate, including a brief description of each item, its quantity, unit cost or wholesale value and its extended value.
I tell my MS patients they certainly don't have to donate their tissues if they don't want to.
They could suggest possible projects, take pictures of their child demonstrating an act of kindness, donate scrapbooking materials or help their child with the scrapbook page.
He or she can donate a remainder interest in the land, which would allow him or her to continue living on the land, with the land trust gaining title and control at the landowner's death.
This year alone, Safeway will donate more than $110 million in food products and financial contributions to community food banks, food pantries, and other hunger relief agencies.
an Ojai company that also did not donate to any lawmaker.