irony

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irony

noun cynicism, ironia, mockery, sarcasm, satire

IRONY, rhetoric. A term derived from the Greek, which signifies dissimulation. It is a refined species of ridicule, which, under the mask of honest simplicity or ignorance, exposes the faults and errors of others, by seeming to adopt or defend them.
     2. In libels, irony may convey imputations more effectually than direct assertion, and render the publication libelous. Hob. 215; Hawk. B. 1, c. 73, s. 4; 3 Chit. Cr. Law, 869, Bac. Ab. Libel, A 3.

References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of dramatic irony in the poem might, however, justifiably cause one to question whether it is a dramatic monologue at all.
After Esther's invitation we read that "Haman went forth that day, with a joyful and glad heart"(5:9)--a wonderful bit of dramatic irony.
Writing of an earlier experiment that heralds the style of Pride and Prejudice, he points out that Austen tells the story "from the point-of-view of one character while qualifying and expanding that viewpoint through dramatic irony and direct comment.
These multiple shifts in point of view occur within chapters and provide dramatic irony.
Though the basis of the humor is the dramatic irony inherent in the situation, Browning never allows the humorous tone to turn into bitter irony or cynicism.
Since which time, he's only been seen on the small screen with an appearance in Judge John Deed and, in someone's sense of dramatic irony, starring in the 13 episode kids' series Star playing a movie star who still attends school.
In a match rich with dramatic irony, Eriksson has therefore demanded that his players show exactly the qualities that he admires so much in English teams - with Leeds being a prime example.
I will return to spectators at the end when I raise the question of dramatic irony as a defining quality of drama.
Charles Payen, on folklore elements in the plays of Adam de la Halle; Herman Braet, on dramatic irony in Adam de la Halle; Nicholas M.
He recalled the dramatic irony of his return to Vietnam as the U.
Finally, from 1975 to 2001, "Hamlet" came to be used primarily as a platform for dramatic irony.