drawback


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drawback

noun damage, decremental, defect, discount, fault, flaw, harm, hurt, impediment, inconvenience, injury, liability, objection, obstacle, protest, protestation, qualification, set-off
See also: bar, burden, check, defect, disadvantage, encumbrance, fault, handicap, hindrance, impediment, liability, obstacle, onus, scruple

DRAWBACK, com. law. An allowance made by the government to merchants on the reexportation of certain imported goods liable to duties, which, in some cases, consists of the whole; in others, of a part of the duties which had been paid upon the importation. For the various acts of congress which regulate drawbacks, see Story, L. U. S. Index, h.t.

References in classic literature ?
I have received a great deal of politeness--some of it really most pressing, and I have experienced no drawbacks whatever.
He was slightly dishevelled at the moment, and his hair stood up in a disordered mop; but in spite of these drawbacks, he was quite passably good-looking.
At the same time, and barring that slight drawback, I am bound to testify that he was the perfect model of a client.
These opinions being equally incontrovertible with those he had already pronounced, he went on to inform us that Jamaica rum, though unquestionably an agreeable spirit of great richness and flavour, had the drawback of remaining constantly present to the taste next day; and nobody being venturous enough to argue this point either, he increased in confidence and became yet more companionable and communicative.
My lady," as her friends called her, sincerely desired to be a genuine lady, and was so at heart, but had yet to learn that money cannot buy refinement of nature, that rank does not always confer nobility, and that true breeding makes itself felt in spite of external drawbacks.
But before going further, it is important to mention here, that though the harpoon may be pitchpoled in the same way with the lance, yet it is seldom done; and when done, is still less frequently successful, on account of the greater weight and inferior length of the harpoon as compared with the lance, which in effect become serious drawbacks.
it is one of the many drawbacks of experience that it frequently prevents our behaving with spirit.
The last three, which Agatha liked, helped to make the contrast between Alton and London tolerable to her, but they had their drawbacks, for good partners at the dances, and good performances at the spiritless opera and concerts, were disappointingly scarce.
Theoretically, this doctrine is unquestionable; but it has practical drawbacks.
You fix iron hoops up over the boat, and stretch a huge canvas over them, and fasten it down all round, from stem to stern, and it converts the boat into a sort of little house, and it is beautifully cosy, though a trifle stuffy; but there, everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.
I suppose every country has some drawbacks, so even this almost perfect fairyland could not be quite perfect.
Still, in spite of these drawbacks, there was a latent charm in her expression, there was an inbred fascination in her manner, which instantly found its way to my sympathies and its hold on my admiration.