drench

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References in classic literature ?
It would not do to loiter in such a neighborhood, so the kindling of the fire was abandoned, the drenched horseman mounted in dripping condition, and the little band pushed forward directly into the plain, going at a smart pace, until they had gained a considerable distance from the place of supposed danger.
laughed Mahbub, looking at the little drenched figure dancing in the wet.
Again, they drugged their patient with opium and drenched him with intoxicating liquors, hoping that the snake might thus be reduced to stupor and perhaps be ejected from the stomach.
A week of buffeting a tempestuous and relentless sea; a week of seasickness and deserted cabins; of lonely quarterdecks drenched with spray--spray so ambitious that it even coated the smokestacks thick with a white crust of salt to their very tops; a week of shivering in the shelter of the lifeboats and deckhouses by day and blowing suffocating "clouds" and boisterously performing at dominoes in the smoking room at night.
Now, if we had been compelled to go afoot over that drenched soil," said he, "we should still be dragging along in a pestilential mire.
The horses, being drenched by the rain, all looked black whether chestnut or bay.
My first concern was to take my weapons apart and dry them, which was rather difficult in the face of the fact that every rag about me was drenched.
A day or two after one of them told me that they wandered about the greater part of the night, close by their own premises, and did not get home till toward morning, by which time, as there had been several heavy showers in the meanwhile, and the leaves were very wet, they were drenched to their skins.
They are all out to-day, and the garden is drenched with the scent.
But there were the two somber figures still following him, though their black sacks were drenched and dripping with water.
Do I not already stand here wet with thy misery, and drenched like a dog?
And this long row seemed particularly hard work to Levin; but when the end was reached and Tit, shouldering his scythe, began with deliberate stride returning on the tracks left by his heels in the cut grass, and Levin walked back in the same way over the space he had cut, in spite of the sweat that ran in streams over his face and fell in drops down his nose, and drenched his back as though he had been soaked in water, he felt very happy.