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DRIP. The right of drip is an easement by which the water which falls on one house is allowed to fall upon the land of another.
     2. Unless the owner has acquired the right by grant or prescription, he has no right so to construct his house as to let the water drip over his neighbor's land. 1 Roll. Ab. 107. Vide Rain water; Stillicidium; and 3 Kent, Com. 436; Dig. 43, 23, 4 et 6; 11 Ad. & Ell. 40; S. C. 39 E. C. L. R. 21.

References in periodicals archive ?
Now, two new studies are extending scientists' understanding of drips.
Here are some "do's" and "don'ts" to consider in managing your drip fluids as a newly found profit center.
They produce fewer PAHs because there's less fat to drip on the heating source.
In revenue ruling 78-375 (sections 305(c) and (b)(2)) the Internal Revenue Service said a shareholder realizes taxable dividend income with respect to the DRIP based on the fair market value of the stock on the date of distribution.
In August 2004, American Capital announced that it had amended the DRIP in order to provide a 5% discount on shares purchased through the reinvestment of dividends, effective for dividends paid starting in December 2004, subject to the terms of the DRIP.
In their initial experiments, they used cancer cells and found that nearly two-thirds of the proteins were apparently DRiPs.
The two strongest, Number 32, 1950 and Autumn Rhythm, deal with the problem by emptying or rather greatly opening the painted field and by introducing straight throws of pigment along with curving and looping drips and pours, as if to acknowledge that at this scale the drip technique, with its implied reference back to the artist's bodily movements, had reached the limit of its effectiveness.
The benefits of using IV drips to boost energy have been questioned, but it is not believed to be harmful.
Medical experts worry the drips, celebrity fans said to include Simon Cowell, Geri Halliwell and Cindy Crawford, encourage clients to down more booze than normal because they can just pop along to a clinic and rid themselves of the next day's inevitable hangover.
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has now suspended the use of such drips because "their benefits no longer outweigh the risk".
Charles Carlson looks at a couple of stock-split candidates in his portfolio, and writes about two other DRIPs that you may want to consider.
Rather than paying out dividends, DRIPS automatically reinvest your stock dividends to purchase more company shares.