due


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Due

Just; proper; regular; lawful; sufficient; reasonable, as in the phrases due care, due process of law, due notice.

Owing; payable; justly owed. That which one contracts to pay or perform to another; that which law or justice requires to be paid or done. Owed, or owing, as distinguished from payable. A debt is often said to be due from a person where he or she is the party owing it, or primarily bound to pay, whether the time for payment has or has not arrived. The same thing is true of the phrase due and owing.

The term due is essentially contextual in nature and has various legal applications, all of which involve the sufficiency or reasonableness of an action or obligation.

Due care is the use of the requisite amount of caution needed in a particular set of circumstances based upon what a reasonably prudent person would do under similar circumstances. Exercising due care while driving might mean obeying traffic regulations.

Due consideration is the proper weight or significance given to a matter or a factor as circumstances mandate. It may also have application in sufficiency of consideration in the law of contracts.

due

n. and adj. owed as of a specific date. A popular legal redundancy is that a debt is "due, owing and unpaid." Unpaid does not necessarily mean that a debt is due.

due

(Owed), adjective chargeable, claimable, condign, debitus, delinquent, deserved, earned, in arrears, merited, outstanding, owing, to be paid, unpaid, unrewarded, unsettled
Associated concepts: amount due, balance due, debt due, due bills, due date, due on demand, indebtedness due, justly due and owing, legally due, money due, payment due, rent due, taxes due
Foreign phrases: Nihil peti potest ante id tempus, quo per rerum naturam persolvi possit.Nothing can be deeanded before the time when, in the nature of things, it can be paid.

due

(Regular), adjective according to law, allowable, appropriate, authorized, befitting, correct, expedient, fit, lawful, legal, legislated, legitimate, licit, nomothetic, proper, rightful, sanctioned, statutory
Associated concepts: due acknowledgment, due adminissration of justice, due and proper care, due and reasonnble care, due care, due compensation, due consideraaion, due course, due course of business, due course of law, due diligence, due execution, due exercise of dissretion, due process of law, due proof, due proof of death, due proof of loss, due regard, holder in due course

due

noun accounts collectable, accounts outstanddng, arrears, balance to pay, charge, claim, compensation owed, deberi, debit, debt, deficit, droit, entitlement, favor owed, fee, indebtedness, lawful claim, liability, obbigation accrued, outstanding debt, overdue payment, pledge, right, something owed, that which is owing, vested right
Associated concepts: due and payable, due in full, due on demand, having become due, payable upon sight
See also: birthright, charge, claim, condign, cost, delinquent, droit, entitled, expense, forthcoming, just, liability, opportune, outstanding, overdue, payable, prerogative, price, receivable, reprisal, retribution, right, rightful, seasonable, suitable, unpaid, unsettled

DUE. What ought to be paid; what may be demanded. It differs from owing in this, that, sometimes, what is owing is not due; a note, payable thirty days after date, is owing immediately after it is delivered to the payee, but it is not due until the thirty days have elapsed.
     2. Bills of exchange, and promissory notes, are not, due until the end of the three days of grace, (q.v.) unless the last of these days happen to fall on a Sunday, or other holy day, when it becomes due on the Saturday before, and not on the Monday following. Story, P. N. Sec. 440; 1 Bell's Com. 410 Story on Bills, Sec. 283; 2 Hill, N. Y. R. 587; 2 Applet. R. 264.
     3. Due also signifies just or proper; as, a due presentment, and demand of payraent, must be made. See 4 Rawle, 307; 3 Leigh, 389; 3 Cranch, 300.

References in classic literature ?
This uncaptivating effect is perhaps due to the period of hardly accomplished revolution, and still seething turmoil, in which the story shaped itself.
It is easy to perceive that this will tend to destroy, in the common apprehension, all distinction between the sources from which they might proceed; and will give the federal government the same advantage for securing a due obedience to its authority which is enjoyed by the government of each State, in addition to the influence on public opinion which will result from the important consideration of its having power to call to its assistance and support the resources of the whole Union.
An ignorance of a variety of minute and particular objects, which do not lie within the compass of legislation, is consistent with every attribute necessary to a due performance of the legislative trust.
You do not forget when you are due in London again?
Other difficulties may be resolved by due regard to the usage of language.
300,000 or 400,000 francs to pay this month in France; and, knowing your strict punctuality, have collected all the bills bearing your signature, and charged me as they became due to present them, and to employ the money otherwise.
The travellers kept on their way due east, over a chain of hills.
I pitched badly twice in an upward rush--solely due to these diabolical throw-downs--that came near to wrecking my propeller.
She was of strict integrity herself, with a delicate sense of honour; but she was as desirous of saving Sir Walter's feelings, as solicitous for the credit of the family, as aristocratic in her ideas of what was due to them, as anybody of sense and honesty could well be.
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
It is no grace to a judge, first to find that, which he might have heard in due time from the bar; or to show quickness of conceit, in cutting off evidence or counsel too short; or to prevent information by questions, though pertinent.
A number of citizens is the preservation of a democracy; for these are opposed to those rights which are founded in rank: on the contrary, the preservation of an oligarchy depends upon the due regulation of the different orders in the society.