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Just; proper; regular; lawful; sufficient; reasonable, as in the phrases due care, due process of law, due notice.

Owing; payable; justly owed. That which one contracts to pay or perform to another; that which law or justice requires to be paid or done. Owed, or owing, as distinguished from payable. A debt is often said to be due from a person where he or she is the party owing it, or primarily bound to pay, whether the time for payment has or has not arrived. The same thing is true of the phrase due and owing.

The term due is essentially contextual in nature and has various legal applications, all of which involve the sufficiency or reasonableness of an action or obligation.

Due care is the use of the requisite amount of caution needed in a particular set of circumstances based upon what a reasonably prudent person would do under similar circumstances. Exercising due care while driving might mean obeying traffic regulations.

Due consideration is the proper weight or significance given to a matter or a factor as circumstances mandate. It may also have application in sufficiency of consideration in the law of contracts.


n. and adj. owed as of a specific date. A popular legal redundancy is that a debt is "due, owing and unpaid." Unpaid does not necessarily mean that a debt is due.


(Owed), adjective chargeable, claimable, condign, debitus, delinquent, deserved, earned, in arrears, merited, outstanding, owing, to be paid, unpaid, unrewarded, unsettled
Associated concepts: amount due, balance due, debt due, due bills, due date, due on demand, indebtedness due, justly due and owing, legally due, money due, payment due, rent due, taxes due
Foreign phrases: Nihil peti potest ante id tempus, quo per rerum naturam persolvi possit.Nothing can be deeanded before the time when, in the nature of things, it can be paid.


(Regular), adjective according to law, allowable, appropriate, authorized, befitting, correct, expedient, fit, lawful, legal, legislated, legitimate, licit, nomothetic, proper, rightful, sanctioned, statutory
Associated concepts: due acknowledgment, due adminissration of justice, due and proper care, due and reasonnble care, due care, due compensation, due consideraaion, due course, due course of business, due course of law, due diligence, due execution, due exercise of dissretion, due process of law, due proof, due proof of death, due proof of loss, due regard, holder in due course


noun accounts collectable, accounts outstanddng, arrears, balance to pay, charge, claim, compensation owed, deberi, debit, debt, deficit, droit, entitlement, favor owed, fee, indebtedness, lawful claim, liability, obbigation accrued, outstanding debt, overdue payment, pledge, right, something owed, that which is owing, vested right
Associated concepts: due and payable, due in full, due on demand, having become due, payable upon sight
See also: birthright, charge, claim, condign, cost, delinquent, droit, entitled, expense, forthcoming, just, liability, opportune, outstanding, overdue, payable, prerogative, price, receivable, reprisal, retribution, right, rightful, seasonable, suitable, unpaid, unsettled

DUE. What ought to be paid; what may be demanded. It differs from owing in this, that, sometimes, what is owing is not due; a note, payable thirty days after date, is owing immediately after it is delivered to the payee, but it is not due until the thirty days have elapsed.
     2. Bills of exchange, and promissory notes, are not, due until the end of the three days of grace, (q.v.) unless the last of these days happen to fall on a Sunday, or other holy day, when it becomes due on the Saturday before, and not on the Monday following. Story, P. N. Sec. 440; 1 Bell's Com. 410 Story on Bills, Sec. 283; 2 Hill, N. Y. R. 587; 2 Applet. R. 264.
     3. Due also signifies just or proper; as, a due presentment, and demand of payraent, must be made. See 4 Rawle, 307; 3 Leigh, 389; 3 Cranch, 300.

References in classic literature ?
He still had recrudescence of geniality, but they were largely periodical and forced, and they were usually due to the cocktails he took prior to meal-time.
Not a single domestic animal can be named which has not in some country drooping ears; and the view suggested by some authors, that the drooping is due to the disuse of the muscles of the ear, from the animals not being much alarmed by danger, seems probable.
When a deviation appears not unfrequently, and we see it in the father and child, we cannot tell whether it may not be due to the same original cause acting on both; but when amongst individuals, apparently exposed to the same conditions, any very rare deviation, due to some extraordinary combination of circumstances, appears in the parent--say, once amongst several million individuals--and it reappears in the child, the mere doctrine of chances almost compels us to attribute its reappearance to inheritance.
These remarks are of course confined to the first appearance of the peculiarity, and not to its primary cause, which may have acted on the ovules or male element; in nearly the same manner as in the crossed offspring from a short-horned cow by a long-horned bull, the greater length of horn, though appearing late in life, is clearly due to the male element.
The image is due to your past experience, as well as to the present stimulus of the words "New York.
We define the "engraphic effect" of a stimulus as the effect in making a difference between the primary and secondary indifference-states, and this difference itself we define as the "engram" due to the stimulus.
Vanstone, feeling what was due to her long friendship with Miss Garth, had apparently placed the fullest confidence in her, on one subject, by way of unsuspiciously maintaining the strictest reserve toward her on another.
It is due to no accident that when one of his most important works,
But this defect was not due to any fault of the regimental commander, for in spite of repeated demands boots had not been issued by the Austrian commissariat, and the regiment had marched some seven hundred miles.
Spots appeared on his nose, the redness of which was evidently due to intemperance, and his mouth twitched nervously.
And as I crossed Phutra's flower-bespangled plain that time I seemed almost to fly, though how much of the sensation was due to Perry's suggestion and how much to actuality I am sure I do not know.
It was due to his whim that I was detained aboard in the first place.