eat away

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See: diminish
References in classic literature ?
I must leave the buck to your arrow, Uncas, or we may kill a deer for them thieves, the Iroquois, to eat.
The skin was so broken at the corners of my mouth that I could not eat the hay, the stalks hurt me.
holding her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this generally happens when one eats cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.
Nothing tastes better,' said she, 'than what one eats by oneself,' and she was very much pleased with her day's work.
Then the criminal orders meat and drink to be brought out, they eat and drink together, he asks a formal pardon, which is not granted at first; however, the husband forgives first one part of the debt, and then another, till at length the whole is remitted.
As there was always no money, Ginger and Pickles were obliged to eat their own goods.
But let us leave that to its own time; see if thou hast anything for us to eat in those alforjas, because we must presently go in quest of some castle where we may lodge to-night and make the balsam I told thee of, for I swear to thee by God, this ear is giving me great pain.
Still it belongs to government, and I ought not to waste it; but, having received the signal that I might rest for an hour" (here he glanced at the sun-dial, for there was everything in the enclosure of Montlhery, even a sun-dial), "and having ten minutes before me, and my strawberries being ripe, when a day longer -- by-the-by, sir, do you think dormice eat them?
Let no one imagine, however, that the lovely Fayaway was in the habit of swallowing great vulgar-looking fishes: oh, no; with her beautiful small hand she would clasp a delicate, little, golden-hued love of a fish and eat it as elegantly and as innocently as though it were a Naples biscuit.
Because,' said the dog, 'I am very very hungry, and have nothing to eat.
My poor, dear mother used to say she liked to see me eat, and it has always been a pleasant reflection to me since that I must have given her much gratification in that direction.
A nice country this is," he grumbled, "where a respectable horse has to eat pink grass