identity

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Related to ego identity: Identity diffusion

identity

(Individuality), noun being, characteristic, difference, dissimilarity, distinction, distinctive feature, distinctness, distinguishing characteristic, distinnuishing quality, idiosyncrasy, individualism, mannerism, oneness, originality, particularity, peculiarity, perceivable dissimilarity, personal characteristic, personality, quality of being singular, self, selfhood, selfness, singularity, speciality, specialty, specific quality, specificity, uniqueness, unlikeness
Associated concepts: duty to ascertain identity, proof of identity
Foreign phrases: Nihil facit error nominis cum de corpore constat.An error in the name is of no consequence when there is certainty as to the person. Ex multitudine signooum, colligitur identitas vera. The true identity of a thing is shown from a number of signs. Nomina sunt mutabilia, res autem immobiles. Names are mutable, but things are immutable.

identity

(Similarity), noun agreement, alikeness, coequality, comparability, conformability, consimilarity, consimilitude, consimility, duplication, equality, equipollence, equipollency, equivalence, homogeneity, identicalness, likeness, match, oneness, parallelism, parity, resemblance, sameness, semblance, similarity, similitude, synonymity, uniformity, unity
See also: par, personality, resemblance, semblance

IDENTITY, evidence. Sameness.
     2. It is frequently necessary to identify persons and things. In criminal prosecutions, and in actions for torts and on contracts, it is required to be proved that the defendants have in criminal actions, and for injuries, been guilty of the crime or injury charged; and in an action on a contract, that the defendant was a party to it. Sometimes, too, a party who has been absent, and who appears to claim an inheritance, must prove his identity and, not unfrequently, the body of a person which has been found dead must be identified: cases occur when the body is much disfigured, and, at other times, there is nothing left but the skeleton. Cases of considerable difficulty arise, in consequence of the omission to take particular notice; 2 Stark. Car. 239 Ryan's Med. Jur. 301; and in consequence of the great resemblance of two persons. 1 Hall's Am. Law Journ. 70; 1 Beck's Med. Jur. 509; 1 Paris, Med. Jur, 222; 3 Id. 143; Trail. Med. Jur. 33; Fodere, Med. Leg. ch. 2, tome 1, p. 78-139.
     3. In cases of larceny, trover, replevin, and the like, the things in dispute must always be identified. Vide 4 Bl. Com. 396.
     4. M. Briand, in his Manuel Complet de Medicine Legale, 4eme partie, ch. 1, gives rules for the discovery of particular marks, which an individual may have had, and also the true color of the hair, although it may have been artificially colored. He also gives some rules for the purpose of discovering, from the appearance of a skeleton, the sex, the age, and the height of the person when living, which he illustrates by various examples. See, generally, 6 C. & P 677; 1 C. & M. 730; 3 Tyr. 806; Shelf. on Mar. & Div. 226; 1 Hagg. Cons. R. 189; Best on Pres. Appx. case 4; Wills on Circums. Ev. 143, et seq.

References in periodicals archive ?
A revision of the extended version of the objective measure of ego identity status: An identity instrument for use with late adolescents.
Development andpreliminary validation of the Ego Identity Process Questionnaire.
For a young child, mirroring is provided unconsciously by adults and peers--most importantly by parents--to establish ego identity.
Ego Identity and Problematic Issues in Identity Formation among Ethiopian-born Adolescents
Ego identity and substance abuse: A comparison of adolescents in residential treatment with adolescents in school.
Erikson recognized the existence of two components of ego identity.
The reference group dependent status has been found to be positively related to both an achieved ego identity and a foreclosed ego identity, gender role conflict, traditional masculinity ideology, attitudes unsupportive of race and gender equity, attitudes conducive to sexual harassment, social identity, and social connectedness; and negatively related to nontraditional masculinity ideology.
These key features seem to add up to one primary kind of PK experience that involves an altered state of consciousness with a narrowing of attention and a loss of sense of surroundings, a sense of connection, dissociation from the individual ego identity, suspension of the intellect, the frequent presence of peak emotions or playfulness, a sense of energy, focused intent, lack of effort, release of attention, openness to the experience, a sense of impact, a "knowing," and an overlap between ESP and PK states and/or energy.
As an image, the hanged man is a metaphor for the suspension of ego identity necessary to collaboration.
To produce a more balanced account, incorporating both historical belongingness and achievement, Wallulis returns in the fourth chapter to the work of Habermas, this time to his more recent work on the theory of communicative action, and compares Habermas and Erikson on ego identity.