elderly


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elderly

adjective advanced in years, aetate proveccus, aged, along in years, hoary, matured, old, seasoned, senescent
See also: old
References in classic literature ?
The elderly men ought to have remembered him, too, with locks as gray in their youth, as their own were now.
Come, then," said the elderly gentleman, ringing and gaining admission, "I know you have a key to unlock hearts.
But he was an elderly man with much experience and knowledge of law and diplomacy.
In this view they were sedulously abetted by their mothers, aunts and other elderly female relatives, who all shared Mrs.
Hilbery was so rich in the gifts which make tea-parties of elderly distinguished people successful, that she scarcely needed any help from her daughter, provided that the tiresome business of teacups and bread and butter was discharged for her.
1] Arnold Sherman, an elderly friend of the Irvings, was there at the same time, and added not a little to the general pleasantness of life.
With them were a rakish-looking elderly man and a young aristocrat, his eyeglass still in his eye, his cigarette burned down to the stub between the fingers of his begloved hand.
The young blades would have it that none other than old Noah himself had come on board with the remnants of the Lost Tribes, and to elderly female passengers spun hair-raising accounts of the sinking of an entire tropic island by volcanic and earthquake action.
Baggs looked at it--lost in an instant some of the fine color plentifully diffused over her face by sleep and spirits--sat down in the nearest chair with a thump that seemed to threaten the very foundations of Number Two, Zion Place--and stared me hard in the face; the most speechless and helpless elderly female I ever beheld.
My maid is to be a model of discretion--an elderly woman, not a skittish young person who will only encourage me.
Such names are given in the western "settlements" only to elderly persons who are not esteemed; to the general disrepute of social unworth is affixed the special reproach of age.
They seemed all middle-aged and elderly work-men, most of them Germans, who flocked by themselves in old-acquaintance groups, and with whom we could have only the slightest contacts.