embargo

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Embargo

A proclamation or order of government, usually issued in time of war or threatened hostilities, prohibiting the departure of ships or goods from some or all ports until further order. Government order prohibiting commercial trade with individuals or businesses of other specified nations. Legal prohibition on commerce.

The temporary or permanent Sequestration of the property of individuals for the purposes of a government, e.g., to obtain vessels for the transport of troops, the owners being reimbursed for this forced service.

embargo

noun authoritative stoppage of trade, ban, bar, control of trade, debarment, denial, detention of ships, disallowance of trade, exclusion from commerce, forbiddance, freeze, governmental order of prohibition, halt, legal restraint, preclusion, prohibition, restraint, restriction, stop, stoppage
Associated concepts: embargo of commerce, embargo of goods, embargo of products
See also: attachment, ban, bar, boycott, check, condemn, debar, enjoin, hindrance, interdict, obstacle, obstruction, prohibit, prohibition, proscribe, proscription, restraint, seclude, veto

EMBARGO, maritime law. A proclamation, or order of state, usually issued in time of war, or threatened hostilities, prohibiting the departure of ships or goods from some, or all the ports of such state, until further order. 2 Wheat. 148.
     2. The detention of ships by an embargo is such an injury to the owner as to entitle him to recover on a policy of insurance against "arrests or detainments." And whether the embargo be legally or illegally laid, the injury to the owner is the same; and the insurer is equally liable for the loss occasioned by it. Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 12, s. 5; 1 Kent, Com. 60 1 Bell's Com. 517, 5th ed.
     3. An embargo detaining a vessel at the port of departure, or in the course of the voyage, does not, of itself, work a dissolution of a charter party, or the contract with the seamen. It is only a temporary restraint imposed by authority for legitimate political purposes, which suspends, for a time, the performance of such contracts, and leaves the rights of parties untouched, 1 Bell's Com. 517; 8 T. R. 259; 5 Johns. R. 308; 7 Mass. R. 325, 3 B. & P. 405-434; 4 East, R. 546-566.

References in periodicals archive ?
From an embargoed American Medical Association press release about media coverage of medical research.
The license excludes the work of senior government officials in embargoed countries (for instance, the memoirs of Fidel Castro, or the uncollected speeches of high-ranking Iranian clerics--two hypothetical books which would be of real value to American readers); and there is no guarantee of permanence or transfer of this general license to any newly-embargoed nation.
Americans may not co-author books or articles with authors in the embargoed countries and may not enter into "transactions" involving any works that are not yet fully completed -- even though authors, publishers an agents generally must work with one another well before a new work is fully created -- and Americans may not provide "substantive or artistic alterations or enhancements" or promote or market either new or previously existing works from the affected countries, unless they obtain a specific license from OFAC.
The Association of American Publishers Professional and Scholarly Publishing division (AAP/PSP), the Association of American University Presses (AAUP), PEN American Center (PEN), and Arcade Publishing are asking the court to strike down OFAC regulations that require publishers and authors to seek a license from the government to perform the routine activities necessary to publish foreign literature from embargoed countries such as Iran, Cuba, and Sudan in the United States.