References in classic literature ?
In a moment she and Emma Jane met and exchanged a breathless embrace.
Hopkins could always find something of this sort to justify the use of the lash, and he seldom failed to embrace such opportunities.
I dreaded being discovered and sent back; for I MUST see Helen,--I must embrace her before she died,--I must give her one last kiss, exchange with her one last word.
Cathy, catching a glimpse of her friend in his concealment, flew to embrace him; she bestowed seven or eight kisses on his cheek within the second, and then stopped, and drawing back, burst into a laugh, exclaiming, 'Why, how very black and cross you look
I embrace this opportunity to assure you once more of my unalterable fidelity to your interests.
If my career were of that better kind that there was any opportunity or capacity of sacrifice in it, I would embrace any sacrifice for you and for those dear to you.
She clapped her hands and laughed, and tried to touch his head; but being too little, laughed again, and stood on tiptoe to embrace him.
I was timidly following her, when she turned round at the parlour door, in the dusk, and taking me in her embrace as she had been used to do, whispered me to love my new father and be obedient to him.
Giving him one last embrace, I observed accidentally, "What are you going to do with that little box of ointment?
I love heat and my sister loves cold--come here and let me embrace you, and then I'll go home at once.
The captain ran to embrace his brother, who placed both hands on his breast so as to have a good look at him, holding him a little way off but as soon as he had fully recognised him he clasped him in his arms so closely, shedding such tears of heartfelt joy, that most of those present could not but join in them.
Then as to the analysis of the ancients and the algebra of the moderns, besides that they embrace only matters highly abstract, and, to appearance, of no use, the former is so exclusively restricted to the consideration of figures, that it can exercise the understanding only on condition of greatly fatiguing the imagination; and, in the latter, there is so complete a subjection to certain rules and formulas, that there results an art full of confusion and obscurity calculated to embarrass, instead of a science fitted to cultivate the mind.