employee


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employee

n. a person who is hired for a wage, salary, fee or payment to perform work for an employer. This is important to determine if one is acting as employee when injured (for worker's compensation) or when he/she causes damage to another, thereby making the employer liable for damages to the injured party. (See: agency, principal, respondeat superior, employer, scope of employment)

employee

noun agent, apprentice, assistant, attaché, factotum, hand, help, helper, hired hand, hireling, laborer, mercenary, personnel, representative, salaried worker, servant, staff person, subordinate, toiler, wage earner, worker, workman
Associated concepts: agent, bona fide employee, borrowed employee, casual employee, de facto employee, indeeendent contractor, joint adventurer, loaned employee, part-time employee, permanent employee, provisional employee, servant, subcontractor
See also: assistant

employee

see EMPLOYMENT.

EMPLOYEE. One who is authorized to act for another; a mandatory.

References in periodicals archive ?
His consultant role was to convince the chief and all of his executives that employee trust had real bottom-line value.
If the employee did not obtain an acceptable third-party offer, he or she could transact a regular sale through the RSC.
Newsletters, which can be mailed to each employee's home or distributed at work, not only serve to inform employees of company programs and news, but also might give family members who read them a favorable view of the company.
Bosses cannot force an employee to accept an involuntary transfer or demotion.
They opposed one shareholder's attempt in 2003 to remove sexual orientation from Coca-Cola's employee nondiscrimination policy and to repeal its domestic-partner benefits.
For instance, an employer cannot terminate an employee for "blowing the whistle" on illegal conduct of the company.
9) John Leisek, a former employee of a company and a member of the National Guard, sued after he was denied reemployment following his absence to participate in National Guard activities.
MS: Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) are not required, but there is some indication that they can be valuable to both employers and employees.
In 1983, when he retired, the company was valued at 50 million [pounds sterling] but Baxendale and his cousin sold it to an employee trust for 5 million [pounds sterling]--'an extraordinary act of generosity', Erdal says.
UNDER LIMITED CONDITIONS EMPLOYERS CAN REFUSE to hire hack an employee following discharge from military duty--for example, a downsizing that eliminated the employee's position might be a legitimate reason for denying reemployment.
However, in the same breath, management is allowed to ask another employee to do the work provided they are told about the initial refusal by the first employe, Lavallie says.