emulative


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Particularly interesting is the analysis of Lavinia's death for the differences between emulative theory and real application, differences showcased in Titus's set piece tutorial that ends in the near-parodic enactment of moralizing emulation.
The latter kind of influence, involving interstate forces, is theorized to result from the emulative and competitive pressures arising naturally within the fixed community of American states (Berry & Berry, 1990, 1999; McLendon, 2003b; McLendon, Hearn, & Deaton, 2006; Walker, 1969).
Whether there are elements inside Gaza emulative of al-Qaeda or not, one cannot but draw the comparison between Abbas' statement and repeated claims by Israel of the same nature.
It presents characters, for example, with snippets of description emulative of magazine profiles.
We have now learned that these "narratives of soul and sweetness, which have touched our hearts with the truest sympathy and enkindled our spirits with the warmest glow of emulative admiration," are really the product of "cunning artists" in the form of "eloquent narrators and delicious poets," who have "dishonestly practiced upon our affections and our credulity, making us very children through the medium of our unsuspecting sympathies.
This type of emulative experience provides aspiring writers with behavioural and social feedback to refine their performance and to develop self-regulative standards that are essential for higher levels of learning (Zimmerman & Kitsantas, 2002).
Actual mothers, as "The New Mother" (1997, 39: 592-609) stresses, naturally imitate the divine pattern and so engender an analogous emulative gratitude; good teachers motivate their pupils by assuming a similarly "maternal" role (1985, 26:325, 334-35).
So the intuitive suggestion of the theory is that, rather than the relative hierarchical social standing, similar social positions can be equally important for emulative product adoption.
Warren Boutcher summarizes the idea, "by 1593, however, English culture had developed on emulative consciousness of Italian, French, and Spanish pragmaticians and their vernacular applications of classical themes and knowledge to the circumstances of sixteenth century Eurasian power politics" (2000: 48).
This paper surveys research on Emulative Neural Network (ENN) models as economic forecasters.
There is a great deal of work to be done in this area to appreciate the close dependence of each one of these commentators on their predecessors, the influence upon their exegesis of changing intellectual contexts and newly recovered scientific and philosophical texts, their use and re-use of established authorities, and the nature of their persistent and often highly emulative dialogue, both with one another and with other writers, traditions, and cultural currents.
Griersonian documentary was designed to evoke an emulative desire amongst viewers--the masses should imagine that they saw themselves on the screen and identify with the moral and political choices of their on-screen personae.