enervated


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Related to enervated: prelapsarian, thesaurus, innervated
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, never do enervated conditions--like those that Skowronek admits seem to exist during Grover Cleveland's second, nonconsecutive, term--abate until presidents (like William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt) succeed in reordering and rejuvenating politics (1993, 48).
The heart is enervated, and it is this enervation that allows for the fight or flight response, involving adrenalin release and increased heart rate, that humans have when they perceive an immediate threat.
Singing his first Florestan for his Seattle Opera debut, Richard Margison was a vocal triumph from his first notes, deliberately pale and enervated in "Gott
These characters are not ennobled by nature, Shebib suggests, but enervated and alienated by economic imperatives.
Not merely rock, he enthralled, mesmerised and enervated an impossibly-packed King Tut's with a visceral performance that was as musically astounding as it was emotionally destructive.
And although the final piece, Drought, doesn't work (how could those slumped, enervated figures carrying dry branches suddenly find the energy for leaps?
The result, the authors say, is an enervated movement, peopled by exhausted elders, who are bitter because they failed to pass the ERA, make abortion accessible, fund child care, or get men to wash dishes.
If we succeed, we will better serve the public interest and bequeath to our successors a profession strengthened, ennobled and invigorated rather than enervated, demoralized and diminished.
Alas, however, as a mystery Babel falls woefully short; in the silly, enervated plot an arty, expatriate female claims that a black poet (based on Leroi Jones?
The market has been enervated by greater consumer take-up for mobile data services as competition has forced down consumer prices.
In the photographs that document this performance, Hayes is frozen, cut and pasted into an enervated contemporary New York.
The symphony's opening, with pounding timpani and throbbing strings, is often taken too slowly, making it sound enervated rather than threatening.