Enfeoffment


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Enfeoffment

Also known as feoffment. Complete surrender and transfer of all land ownership rights from one person to another. In old English Law, an enfeoffment was a transfer of property by which the new owner was given both the right to sell the land and the right to pass it on to heirs, evidenced by livery of seisin, a ceremony for transferring the possession of real property from one individual to another.

See: alienation
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In this work, entitled "Postscript to a Collection of Poems Written on Lin Ke-chong's Appointment as an Envoy to Siam", Ma noted: "In the Ten-yin year of the Cheng-hua reign (1482/83), an envoy sent by Siam came to submit a request for enfeoffment.
However, an MSL reference dated five years later (1487) suggests something more behind the dispute: "Recently, there were differences between the language of the gold-leaf memorial by which enfeoffment was requested and the tally-slips and despatch note provided.
Consolidating their authority through litigation, incorporation, and enfeoffment, local town fathers built halls as "the seat and symbol of the autonomous community"(89).
First, and most importantly, there was the growing practice of enfeoffment to use, which enabled a testator to evade the common-law rule prohibiting bequests of freehold land by will.
Duke Zhuang refuses this enfeoffment, but overrides an advisor's admonition to give Duan an alternate city because "Lady Jiang [his mother] desires it" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Zhu Yuanzhang, who became the first Ming emperor, and Xu Da were close friends, and although much of Xu's life was spent elsewhere, his enfeoffment established his family in Nanjing.