engulfment


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See: osmosis
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Role engulfment is a term that is used to describe the student's all encompassing involvement and focus on athletics, which leads to narrowing of educational aspiration and goal commitment (Briggs, 1996).
At the corner of detachment is autonomy, which carries within it the seeds of avoidance and isolation, and fear of engulfment.
They also interviewed survivors, witnesses and emergency personnel involved in rescue operations at engulfment sites.
At the funeral earlier that day, John tells us that his mother was dry-eyed, cool, and efficient; middle-aged women "of various shapes, sizes, and shades" dominate the proceedings at the funeral reception, and John feels oppressed by the odor of dying flowers and cheap perfume as well as by the image of desiccated masculinity his maternal grandfather presents (22); his brother Bill sits on the couch, "the soft pillows rising around him, seeming to swallow him" (23)--a portentous image of engulfment in light of the blame John casts on Yvette later for Bill's death.
20 For an interesting recent discussion of Orsino's metaphors of engulfment and digestion, see Rene Girard 112-114.
2) Personal Power ("I am at the mercy of forces beyond my control") authority issues (intimidated by authority, rebellious against authority, competitive to gain authority) compulsive or addictive patterns self-destructiveness, self-sabotage, or self-hatred deep sense of shame or feeling judged powerlessness (blaming others for problems or failures) injustice ("Life isn't fair") leading to vengefulness or self-pity entitlement ("The world owes me") (3) Identity (identity is externally defined: "You tell me who I am") fear of abandonment and/or engulfment identity confusion social exclusion ("I don't belong") inhibition ("Don't be me") (4) Worthiness ("I am not worthy to be here"), manifested either as inferiority or as grandiosity.
The properties leading to the final states in the engulfment and sorting out experiments are transitive: if tissue A is spread upon by tissue B, and B spread upon by C, then A will be spread upon by C if the two tissues are mutually adhesive.
These men fear violent engulfment, annihilation and dissolution from erotic contact with women.
Transformation in the second phase of life is the re-enactment, or recapitulation, of earlier prototypes: (1) the process of conception, leaving the spirit world to enter a body; (2) the process of birth, leaving the mother's womb to enter the world; (3); the rapprochement subphase of the separation-individuation process (the third developmental stage, from 18 months to 3 years), finding balance between dependence and engulfment, between intimacy and alienation; (4) the conflicted needs for belonging and independence of the adolescent developmental stage; and (5) the conflicts in marital interaction and other adult relationships, including the mid-life rapprochement between adult and parent, all recapitulations of the developmental phase.
Using synthetic biology to build a bottom-up model of phagocytosis should answer many open questions, including: are spatial cues resulting from particle binding required for membrane wrapping around the particle Is directed initiation of actin polymerisation sufficient to render GUVs capable of phagocytosis What is the role of the membrane-supporting actin cortex and how does the affinity of the receptors affect the engulfment process Beyond phagocytosis, the minimal-model approach I propose will also be useful to study other cellular functions requiring actin-driven membrane reorganisation, such as cell mobility.
Transformation in the second phase of life is the m-enactment, or recapitulation, of earlier prototypes: (1) the process of conception, leaving the spirit world to enter a body; (2) the process of birth, leaving the mother's womb to enter the world; (3) rapprochement in the third developmental stage, from 18 months to 3 years, finding balance between dependence and engulfment, between intimacy and alienation; and (4) the conflicted needs for belonging and independence of the adolescent developmental stage.
Neural activity plays a role in synaptic pruning, but the neuronal eat-me signals that mediate phagocytic recognition and engulfment of synapses remain to be identified.