enmesh

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These indications can be related to psychological disturbance, which had its source in an enmeshment of narcissistic bonds in the Ruskin family.
This terrible enmeshment of John James's and Margaret's narcissistic defenses must be borne in mind when considering the effect on John Ruskin of his parents' apparently opposite and balanced approaches to affection--his father's spendthrift ardor and his mother's preservation, order, and control of feeling.
Of course, the most obvious process addiction in the novel is the "love" of Heathcliff and Catherine, one of the most famous examples in literature of pure enmeshment, a loss of boundaries so total that it seems to triumph over death, sustaining the myth that romantic love is a viable form of spirituality.
The body is often overlooked in examinations of learning, along with the body's enmeshments in its social, material and cultural nets of action.
Because he could not be independent emotionally to understand their own childhood enmeshments, he could not respond to them without either corrupting his love for them or becoming enlisted in their struggle for control.
De Beauvoir condemns the contemporary family as an inadequate solution for "the problems generated by an evil society" (15), but Morrison's view of family relations depicted in her novels is considerably more textured, since she is interested in the etiology and the consequences of enmeshment.
Jake's implied enmeshment with his children in this scene has been largely ignored by critics, who occasionally idealize him as the perfect parent; his, the perfect family: "[Jake's] history of vulnerability and longing, of warmth and care, his unique relation to property, contributes to the picture of ideal paternity offered by Macon/Jake" (Hirsch 77).
If Milkman's escape from parental enmeshment is understood as the narrative's central concern, his "flight" at the novel's conclusion comes into clearer focus.