ensconced


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Related to ensconced: incensed, endures

ensconced

adjective deep-rooted, deeply ennrained, deeply implanted, deeply manifest, engrained, impeded, imprinted, manifest
Associated concepts: precedence deep-rooted in the law, common law
See also: clandestine, safe, situated
References in periodicals archive ?
Somewhat alarmed, Kessler and associates secured the premises only later to discover exhibition director Weyland ensconced in the neighboring bar.
By contrast, the privileged of today are ensconced in climate-controlled private boxes with other services devoted exclusively to them.
just as Germany became tightly ensconced under fascist control.
And regulating lobbyists -- feeble as the council-approved measure was -- has nothing to do with keeping career politicians comfortably ensconced in their offices.
Why would a happily ensconced Manhattan office tenant choose to relocate to the Hudson Waterfront?
Located just off the Magnificent Mile, the recently refurbished Terrace is ensconced in the Conrad Chicago.
Arriving safely on our shores, scarcely older than the new Republic itself, Audubon soon found himself ensconced in a yeasty new nation where everything seemed to be in motion.
Ensconced in the updated Bladen Hall, Student Services staffers will be trained in providing top-notch customer experiences.
With Leicester now ensconced in the Championship relegation zone, Tuesday night's 1-0 defeat at Plymouth - City's sixth successive Championship reverse and their 10th game without a win - has proved the final straw.
The deceased are ensconced in steel caskets lined with plush upholstery, then entombed in concrete vaults, as if to prevent decay.
While minority governments are often unstable, the year 2005 began with the Liberals safely ensconced in government.
Ensconced within the older field of American colonial cultural history but contributing to the wider, newer interdisciplinary study of the history of the senses, Rath explores the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century "sensorium" of peoples of eastern North America and parts of the Caribbean, waging a campaign on three soundstages.