ensuing


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He added that following the disqualification of Jehangir Tareen, the people of Lodharan will be able to elect their representative before the ensuing general elections.
The trial court also rejected the defendants' argument that the explosion and fire was an "ensuing loss" and, thus, a covered loss under the policy despite the vandalism exception and that the defendants failed to meet their burden of establishing that the policy's ensuing loss provision was applicable in the present case.
Talking to press on the sidelines of the 64th Republic Day Celebration here at the Secretariat Plaza Saturday, the Chief Minister disclosed that they would come to know by Monday of the final picture of the party as far as ensuing State general election was concerned.
In the ensuing clash, the two insurgents and two police guards were killed, while a third guard was injured in the shootout.
in 1932 and the ensuing events that influenced the rights of veterans and citizens and stained the pages of U.
Gary Jones headed over, Harper produced a reflex, point-blank save to deny Chris Dagnall, who then headed wide from the ensuing corner.
The dramatic description of the ensuing rescue effort opens this story of the deadly power of snow.
On the ensuing kickoff, Thompson ran in the go-ahead Crenshaw touchdown, and teammate Ronnie Warren had a 29-yard interception to culminate the scoring.
He describes the ensuing panic and alterations of daily routine caused by thousands of hoax anthrax letters received throughout the nation during the months of October and early November 2001 and the FBI's ongoing investigation.
Ensuing political violence left 30,000 people dead, including Catholic priests, religious, and lay activists.
It is frequently the case that a manipulation of the C, D and T variables yields benefits to the organization that outweigh the ensuing increase in ROA.
In this crisply-written and thoroughly-researched book, the author contends that higher education has over the last two decades devolved into a money-grubbing machine, just like any other industry, with its professors behaving as businessmen, and corruption ensuing, affecting the very research that is often upheld as fact, but instead, Washburn says, is influenced by commercial interests.