enter

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Enter

To form a constituent part; to become a part or partaker; to penetrate; share or mix with, as tin enters into the composition of pewter. To go or come into a place or condition; to make or effect an entrance; to cause to go into or be received into.

In the law of real property, to go upon land for the purpose of taking possession of it. In strict usage, the entering is preliminary to the taking possession but in common parlance the entry is now merged in the taking possession.

To place anything before a court, or upon or among the records, in a formal and regular manner, and usually in writing as in to enter an appearance, or to enter a judgment. In this sense the word is nearly equivalent to setting down formally in writing, in either a full or abridged form.

enter

(Go in), verb arrive, board, come in, cross the threshold, effect an entrance, gain admittance, gain entry, go into, inire, intrare, introire, make an entrance, pass into, set foot in, step in, walk in
Associated concepts: breaking and entering, forcible entry, immigration, lawful entry, open and peaceable entry

enter

(Insert), verb implant, infuse, inject, intercalate, interject, interpose, introduce, intromit, place into, put in, stick in

enter

(Penetrate), verb bore, cut into, cut through, drill, empierce, gore, impale, infiltrate, interpenetrate, lance, perforate, pervade, pierce, prick, puncture, sink into, stab, transpierce

enter

(Record), verb catalogue, check in, chronicle, enroll, file, inscribe, inscroll, jot down, list, log, make an entry, mark down, note, place in the record, post, put down, put in writing, put on record, referre, register, set down, tabulate, take down, transcribe, write down, write in
Associated concepts: entered on the record, entry of a judgment
See also: book, compete, embark, enroll, file, impanel, inscribe, introduce, join, note, penetrate, pervade, record, register, set down
References in classic literature ?
When the professor enters a beer-hall in the evening where students are gathered together, these rise up and take off their caps, and invite the old gentleman to sit with them and partake.
He and I should differ very little in our estimation of the two," interrupted she, with a sort of serious smile"much less, perhaps, than he is aware of, if we could enter without ceremony or reserve on the subject.
The harm of it is, that her father would hate me if he found I suffered her to enter your house; and I am convinced you have a bad design in encouraging her to do so,' I replied.
While they were gone an old Mussulman devotee appeared at the door, and asked leave to enter, as it was the hour of prayer.
I saw, with the utmost surprise, an old Moor enter my chamber, with a kind of small dagger, all over rusty, and a mallet in his hand, and three cups of horn about half a foot long.
Fellow citizens of the United States: in compliance with a custom as old as the government itself, I appear before you to address you briefly and to take, in your presence, the oath prescribed by the Constitution of the United States, to be taken by the President "before he enters on the execution of his office.
Thou art in the right of it, Sancho," said Don Quixote; "and the bachelor Samson Carrasco, if he enters the pastoral fraternity, as no doubt he will, may call himself the shepherd Samsonino, or perhaps the shepherd Carrascon; Nicholas the barber may call himself Niculoso, as old Boscan formerly was called Nemoroso; as for the curate I don't know what name we can fit to him unless it be something derived from his title, and we call him the shepherd Curiambro.
And, because the blood which thus enters into the heart passes through these two pouches called auricles, it thence happens that their motion is the contrary of that of the heart, and that when it expands they contract.
I will, in this place, hazard an observation, which will not be the less just because to some it may appear new; which is, that the more the operations of the national authority are intermingled in the ordinary exercise of government, the more the citizens are accustomed to meet with it in the common occurrences of their political life, the more it is familiarized to their sight and to their feelings, the further it enters into those objects which touch the most sensible chords and put in motion the most active springs of the human heart, the greater will be the probability that it will conciliate the respect and attachment of the community.
The carriole at last arrived in the main street of Alencon, called the rue Saint-Blaise at the end toward Montagne, but near the hotel du More it takes the name of the rue de la Porte-de-Seez, and becomes the rue du Bercail as it enters the road to Brittany.
It is with us a Law of Nature that the brain of the Isosceles class shall begin at half a degree, or thirty minutes, and shall increase(if it increases at all) by half a degree in every generation; until the goal of 60 degrees is reached, when the condition of serfdom is quitted, and the freeman enters the class of Regulars.
He merely accomplishes each lesson as a task to be rid of as quickly as possible and I am sure that no lesson ever again enters his mind until the hours of study and recitation once more arrive.