environmental impact report


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environmental impact report

n. a study of all the factors which a land development or construction project would have on the environment in the area, including population, traffic, schools, fire protection, endangered species, archeological artifacts, and community beauty. Many states require such reports be submitted to local governments before the development or project can be approved, unless the governmental body finds there is no possible impact, which finding is called a "negative declaration." (See: EIR, negative declaration)

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A copy of the Notice of Preparation for the Draft Environmental Impact Report is posted on the LADWP website, www.
The environmental impact report will be available at the Valley Plaza, the Sun Valley, Panorama City, North Hollywood and Van Nuys branch libraries.
In 1991 the city approved an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) that identified the LORP as mitigation for Owens Valley water-gathering activities by the city.
is tribal administrator for the Fernandeno Tataviam band of Mission Indians, a band that was labeled extinct in an environmental impact report for a housing development planned near Santa Clarita.
Postponing the planned environmental impact report would delay the department's selecting a site from among five candidates to resume production of so-called plutonium pits.
California, it turns out, is mired in an environmental impact report on plastic pipe that it began 11 years ago, primarily at the behest of the Pipe Trades Council.
Work on an environmental impact report began in 1982, shortly after IAPMO added CPVC to the Uniform Plumbing Code.
Members of the Sylmar Neighborhood Council asked the board to postpone a decision, saying the impact of traffic as a result of growth had not been properly analyzed in the environmental impact report.
The project's environmental impact report and subdivision maps were approved 5-0 by commissioners at a meeting Tuesday night.
Before that, the environmental impact report must receive input from the public and approval by the Los Angeles Community College District's board of trustees.
According to the environmental impact report, which affirmed the viability of high-speed trains in California, high-speed train travel between San Diego and Los Angeles will take one hour and fifteen minutes, and just over two and a half hours from San Francisco to Los Angeles.
The city appealed the decree, claiming it and the environmental impact report violate the California Environmental Quality Act, the federal Clean Water and Clean Air acts and the National Environmental Policy Act.

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