episode

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Related to episodic: Episodic ataxia

episode

noun chapter, circumstance, event, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, sequel, short-lived event, sudden event
See also: event, experience, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, scene
References in periodicals archive ?
4%) of the 135 episodic migraine patients, compared with 30 (15.
Interestingly, among the small cohort of chronic migraineurs who were following the RLB, they were progressively month after month converting into episodic migraineurs, while the episodic migraineurs who were not following the RLB were converting to chronic migraine, month after month," the neurologist said in an interview at the meeting sponsored by the International Headache Society and the American Headache Society.
Fried said understanding the underpinnings of episodic memory formation is a central problem in neuroscience and may be of important clinical significance because this type of memory is affected in patients suffering from Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases.
This partnership will accelerate Telltale's ability to create not only original games, but episodic television series based on our game properties -- an area at the cutting edge of industry growth.
The authors found that episodic migraine was more common among obese participants than people having a healthy weight.
Episodic controls are likely to be less efficacious than long-standing controls because evasion is easier in a country that already has experience in international capital markets than in one that does not.
Lastly, pharmacologic treatment to prevent episodic migraine may be warranted.
The researchers found that the episodic physical activity roughly tripled the risk of heart attack, but because a sudden burst of activity is rather uncommon among otherwise-sedentary people, the risk of having a heart attack while running to catch a train is actually small.
Recalling a dinner party attended last week, including where the event took place, who was there, what you ate and what the conversations were about, exemplifies episodic memory.
Episodic memory allows people to recall events in their own lives, while recognition memory allows us to judge whether something is new or familiar.
Previous work by Cardiff and Bristol research group has shown that within the temporal lobe of the brain are two neural systems, which can work independently to support episodic and recognition memory respectively.