epithet


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Related to epithet: specific epithet, Transferred epithet
References in classic literature ?
He had a caustic tongue and fine assortment of damaging epithets, most of which were levelled at my devoted skull during those three months.
Kemball, in one of his sermons, alludes to his hundred wives under this endearing epithet.
Kearney," she said dryly, "one would think that some silly, conceited girl"--she was quite earnest in her epithets, for a sudden, angry conviction of some coquetry and disingenuousness in Jessie had come to her in contemplating its effects upon the young fellow at her side--"some country jilt, had been trying her rustic hand upon you.
The king was in a flaming fury, and launched out his challenge and epithets with a most royal vigor.
I hesitate not to submit it to the decision of any candid and honest adversary of the proposed government, whether language can furnish epithets of too much asperity, for so shameless and so prostitute an attempt to impose on the citizens of America.
This cold officer upon a monument, who dropped epithets unconcernedly down, would be finer as a dead man, he thought.
Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel-writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding -- joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust.
Robson leant upon his gun, and laughed excessively at the violence of his nephew's passion, and the bitter maledictions and opprobrious epithets he heaped upon me.
Hooja stood in the bow of his boat, alternately urging his men to greater speed and shouting epithets at me.
And as I departed, he went on cursing and abusing my faithful friend and servant with epithets I will not defile this paper with repeating.
Epithet means "abusive names or funny names "- some examples are chicken pox, tomato, potato, icecream etc.
The nineteenth-century critic Ruskin praised the poet for his sensitivity in giving the earth the epithet ' life-giving" at the moment when ii is being described as the covering of the dead.