eponym

(redirected from eponymy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
See: call, title
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Eponymy (from epi = on, above, and onoma = name) was also studied by Ferdinand de Saussure, his records being edited with an adequate commentary by J.
above) transferred as eponymy to apply to a set of humans, in the formation of a common word, do not presuppose denotational content for the base names: "the lexical semantics of the derived noun is based on speakers' encyclopaedic knowledge of the person associated with the names; the name itself has no lexical semantics to transmit" (Anderson--Colman 2000: 9).
In the case of place names, the role of eponymy is somewhat akin to its role in science because the original intention is usually honorific.
In science, though the honorific purpose for eponymy plays a much larger role, the practical purpose is exactly analogous to that in everyday life.
By eponymy we mean the formation of common nouns from proper nouns.
1980, Stigler's Law of Eponymy, Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences, 39, 147-158.
Stigler's Law of Eponymy," Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences, 2d series, vol.
3) The name thus becomes a "dummy" which is delivered in speech, enabling us once again to conclude, in this study, that the eponymy is a worldview.
Ferdinand de Saussure's theory can, however, be supported equally from the angle of eponymy as an anthropological form of language expression.
That is to say, the existence of elements such as fire and soul allow for a kind of mirroring, within the sensible world, of the eponymy relationship that standardly holds between Forms and sensibles.
During the eponymy of Ittabsi-den-Assur, the three qepu of KAV 99 (and Ma anayu, one of the addressees, as well) discover damage while examining the textiles.
To prevent the spread of the insects, they promptly removed them from the batch and recorded their deed: "Musallim-Assur, Assur-sallimanni, Ma anayu and Nabu-belu-damiq, the trustworthy intermediaries, removed from the chests altogether 20[+ x] damaged garments during the airing operation; eponymy of Ittabsiden-Assur.