equitable interest


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See: claim, right

equitable interest

an interest in property that can be asserted against everyone except a bona fide purchaser of the legal estate or interest for value without notice.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the buyer holds legal title to all of the assets subject to a PACA trust, PACA sellers retain an equitable interest in such assets.
In both these kinds of trusts, the beneficiary has a definite identifiable, equitable interest in some property,' the petitioner argued.
It further identifies a bare trust a "which has a single beneficiary" a as one in which "the beneficiary has an identifiable, equitable interest in some property.
It further identifies a bare trust which has a single beneficiary as one in which the beneficiary has an identifiable, equitable interest in some property.
It further identifies a bare trust 'which has a single beneficiary' as one in which 'the beneficiary has an identifiable, equitable interest in some property.
It is difficult to envisage any situation in which such a claimant will be able to argue that his original equitable interest has been 'upgraded' to absolute ownership by misappropriation.
Dot Esports reported that prior to the acquisition, Esports Mogul held a 20% equitable interest in eSports Hero, with a ten-year exclusivity agreement for the APAC region.
question of whether a spouse's equitable interest in the
Notice includes more than just knowledge of a prior equitable interest.
The proposed amendment drew opposition from board member Bill Davis, who said criminal defense lawyers sometimes put nonrefundable fees in their trust accounts to protect the equitable interest of the client should the client or lawyer die before the representation is concluded.
01(23) defines "owner" as "a person who is the owner of any legal or equitable interest in real property, which interest can be sold by legal process, and who enters into a contract for the improvement of the real property.
7) Imputing to the debtor an equitable interest in purportedly fraudulently transferred property was well intentioned: the Fifth Circuit wanted to prevent debtors from skirting the law and to protect creditors' interests even though the trustee had not yet recovered the property.