impotence

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impotence

n. the male's inability to copulate. Impotence can be grounds for annulment of a marriage if the condition existed at the time of the marriage and grounds for divorce whenever it occurs under the laws of 26 states. It should not be confused with sterility, which means inability to produce children.

impotence

noun debilitation, debility, failure, feebleness, helplessness, impotency, impuissance, inability, inadequacy, incapacitation, incapacity, incompetence, incompetency, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, ineptitude, infirmitas, lack of power, lack of strength, powerlessness, unfitness, weakness
See also: desuetude, detriment, disability, fault, frailty, impuissance, inability, inaction, incapacity, inefficacy, languor, prostration

IMPOTENCE, med. jur. The incapacity for copulation or propagating the species. It has also been used synonymously with sterility.
     2. Impotence may be considered as incurable, curable, accidental or temporary. Absolute or incurable impotence, is that for which there is no known relief, principally originating in some malformation or defect of the genital organs. Where this defect existed at the time of the marriage, and was incurable, by the ecclesiastical law and the law of several of the American states, the marriage may be declared void ab initio. Com. Dig. Baron and Feme, C 3; Bac. Ab. Marriage, &c., E 3; 1 Bl. Com. 440; Beck's Med. Jur. 67; Code, lib. 5, t. 17, l. 10; Poyn. on Marr. and Div. ch. 8; 5 Paige, 554; Merl. Rep. mot Impuissance. But it seems the party naturally impotent cannot allege that fact for the purpose of obtaining a divorce. 3 Phillim. R. 147; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 384. See 3 Phillim. R. 325; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 408; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 877; 1 Par. & Fonb. 172, 173. note d; Ryan's Med. Jur. 95. to 111; 1 Bl. Com. 440; 2 Phillim. R. 10; 1 Hagg. R. 725. See, as to the signs of impotence, 1 Briand, Med. Leg. c. 2, art. 2, Sec. 2, n. 1; Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, art. Impuissance; and, generally, Trebuchet, Jur. de la. Med. 100, 101, 102; 1 State Tr. 315; 8 State Tr. App. No. 1, p. 23; 3 Phillm. R. 147; 1 Hagg. Eccl. R. 523; Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 237.

References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have shown that atherosclerosis or a hardening of the arteries cause both erectile dysfunction and heart disease.
But men who merely experiment with erectile dysfunction medications are often disappointed with the results, with the spontaneity-killing wait of 30 minutes or more for the medications to kick in, or with such side effects as flushing, headaches, and even blue-tinted vision.
As a result, physicians should ask all men in their practice who are older than 25 about erectile dysfunction at every office visit, he said.
If you look at similar medications, such as Muse, which is an injectable drug for men with erectile dysfunction, the product information says that "this drug may be associated with increased risk of STDs.
One-third of the men were informed they were being placed on a [beta]-blocker and that such drugs can cause erectile dysfunction.
Erectile dysfunction (ED) -- the inability to sustain an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse -- is a medical condition that affects an estimated 30 million men in the U.
For men, erectile dysfunction increases with age - a 50-year-old has 3-1/2 times the risk of a 20-year-old - but I think it's worth remembering that 7 percent of those 20-year-olds are also reporting erectile dysfunction.
Fore Pharma's latest report 'Global Erectile Dysfunction Drug Pipeline Capsule - 2012 Update' provides most up-to-date information on key Research and Development activities (R&D) in the global Erectile Dysfunction market.
The acceptability of erectile dysfunction drugs is expected to increase owing to increasing public awareness about erectile dysfunction and the need to treat it.
The demand for erectile dysfunction drugs is high and is continuously rising as it caters to the needs of the growing elderly population and the high incidence rates of chronic disorders comprising hypertension, renal diseases and diabetes, neurological disorders and hormonal insufficiencies.
Washington, June 7 ( ANI ): A new study has found that one in four men seeking medical help for newly-developed erectile dysfunction (ED) was younger than 40 years, and nearly half of young men with the condition had severe ED.
In the interim, 119 men developed mild erecrile dysfunction; 70, moderate erectile dysfunction; and 72, severe or complete erectile dysfunction.