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By no means are we suggesting that resource allocation is the only factor related to success in addressing evaluative standards or creating a solid program assessment strategy.
Librarians involved in educating online information consumers have probably utilized some form of evaluative criteria to relate the importance of quality assessment.
Developing close friendships with supervisees is ill-advised because supervision has an evaluative component.
15) BP-1 is silent regarding the thesis, since it does not address the relationship of evaluative properties (other than goodness) and reasons.
But adhering to sound processes - asking ourselves good evaluative questions when we face tough choices and entering into discourse as we gather the information on which to base our decisions - will help all of us avoid untold troubles that result from a lack of thorough analysis.
When a doctor seeks to justify her unilateral "no" on evaluative grounds--for example, withdrawing life-sustaining care from a patient in a persistent vegetative state because such a form of life seems not worth sustaining--she overgeneralizes her medical expertise.
Posner and Schmidt, 1984), but our knowledge of the value systems and evaluative attitudes of future executives is relatively limited (Jacogs, Rettig, and Bovass, 1991; Hoge and Hoge, 1992).
Schussler Fiorenza further relates this process of evaluation to her idea of an "ekklesia of wo/men" who "must present interpretive 'cases,' strategies and their ramifications as well as evaluative principles and theoretical models for public discussion, deliberation, and debate" (134).
Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) in Toronto claim deaths from opioid use in Ontario have doubled.
During a press conference held by Minister of Finance Mohammed Shateh and the Evaluative Monetary Fund Commission, Shateh said public debt rate is expected to reach 151% by the end of the current year, after having amounted to 162% during last year.
We also coded each statement to see whether it was evaluative or cognitive, and whether the contribution was a "surface" one or in-depth (that is, advanced the discussion by offering new reasoning).
I argue that the logic of the famous argument in the Protagoras turns just on two crucial assumptions: that desiring is having evaluative beliefs (or that valuing is desiring), and that no one can have contradictory preferences at the same time; hedonism is not essential to the logic of the argument.