evanescent


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A fine if evanescent canzone shows the poet's serious, Poundian attention to matters of technique.
Skeptical, because reality regarding the vicissitudes of something as evanescent as choreography made one wonder about the process of preservation in Soviet Russia, a state that kept the corpse of its most famous political hero glowing under glass like a sleeping babe.
Once her preferred vehicles, material metaphors--like the deployment of clothing as the first architecture of the body--are here enveloped in an acoustic surround and counterpointed by others, spectral, unbounded, and evanescent.
Equally understated was a subtle account of Ravel's La Valse, its veiled tones evanescent as if experienced through breeze-blown gauze curtains in a haunted ballroom, until at last we experienced the full clamour and disintegration of the collapse of this grandiose world built on decadence - a post-First World War metaphor to chill the soul.
Which assonantly in a foreign tongue declares A tomorrow if not loud lowings of a bull Girl bicyclists go down wide avenues evanescent and Many of them go to repeat their lessons in a little odeon for Greedy lips.
Most Evanescent Choreography goes to Anna Laerkesen's Sighing Land.
High-brightness LEDs have become one of our sweet spots - for LEDs to penetrate into markets where today traditional evanescent light bulbs dominate, output power per watt needs to increase to 70 to 80 lumens/watt.
Question to Cooley: Why posit an ideal receptor in this way, putting pressure on what could otherwise be a more playful and evanescent linkage, more Meyerholdian in spirit?
In her first act, Muller deploys all the evanescent technical beauty associated with other great Giselles including Alicia Markova, Marion Tait and before them Taglioni, who gave this 19th century Romantic classic its initial mystery and allure.
Unlike the evanescent character of Bettarini's writings, however, Di Biasio's words petrify into rigid residues of grief.
Resultant Gaussian Blur images appear natural, organic, and evanescent.
Responding to such titles as Flower in the Wind, 1963, On a Clear Day, 1973, and Happy Valley, 1967, critics initially sought to connect the febrile space and evanescent light that suffuses her subtly elusive abstractions with landscape experiences, whether grounded in the deserts of the American Southwest where she spent the greater part of her life, or in the vast prairies of southern Canada where she was born and passed a formative if brief segment of her childhood.