events


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References in classic literature ?
They mutually exhorted each other to be of use in the event of the chances of war throwing either of the parties into the hands of his enemies.
Familiar as it stands in the writer's recollection,--for it has been an object of curiosity with him from boyhood, both as a specimen of the best and stateliest architecture of a longpast epoch, and as the scene of events more full of human interest, perhaps, than those of a gray feudal castle,--familiar as it stands, in its rusty old age, it is therefore only the more difficult to imagine the bright novelty with which it first caught the sunshine.
He was, indeed, the Custom-House in himself; or, at all events, the mainspring that kept its variously revolving wheels in motion; for, in an institution like this, where its officers are appointed to subserve their own profit and convenience, and seldom with a leading reference to their fitness for the duty to be performed, they must perforce seek elsewhere the dexterity which is not in them.
Was not my future--at all events my immediate future--to be spent in answering them?
But again, Tragedy is an imitation not only of a complete action, but of events inspiring fear or pity.
And as to external events, Grief and Joy keep a continual vicissitude around it and within it.
Many years have rolled by since the occurrence of these events, and Miss Henley continues the same in every thing but appearance.
To him he made over all that he knew as to the events above recorded, and as to the present condition of the prince.
We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
I exulted in the boundless freedom of the design; the open air of that immense scene, where adventure followed adventure with the natural sequence of life, and the days and the nights were not long enough for the events that thronged them, amidst the fields and woods, the streams and hills, the highways and byways, hostelries and hovels, prisons and palaces, which were the setting of that matchless history.
Thirdly and Lastly): That Characters which may not have appeared, and Events which may not have taken place, within the limits of our own individual experience, may nevertheless be perfectly natural Characters and perfectly probable Events, for all that.
We know to-day that he was not so colossal, and that he loomed among the events of his times less largely than the Manuscript would lead us to believe.