References in classic literature ?
Thorndike it was evident that young Andrews had entirely forgotten him.
Happiness, excitement, the color of the green dress, and the touch of lovely pink in the coral necklace had transformed the little brown wren for the time into a bird of plumage, and Adam Ladd watched her with evident satisfaction.
One might, indeed, rest sufficiently satisfied with what, it is evident, must be, in general, the results of such a relation, with- out seeking farther to find whether they have fol- lowed in every instance.
Elton, on his return, made his own indifference as evident and indubitable as she could not doubt he would anxiously do, she could not imagine Harriet's persisting to place her happiness in the sight or the recollection of him.
It is evident from the state of the country, from the habits of the people, from the experience we have had on the point itself, that it is impracticable to raise any very considerable sums by direct taxation.
Instantly the scene changed as by magic; the foremost vessel swung broadside toward us, and bringing her guns into play returned our fire, at the same time moving parallel to our front for a short distance and then turning back with the evident intention of completing a great circle which would bring her up to position once more opposite our firing line; the other vessels followed in her wake, each one opening upon us as she swung into position.
Now it is evident that each of the modes of imitation above mentioned will exhibit these differences, and become a distinct kind in imitating objects that are thus distinct.
It is very evident that it is the letter W which M.
When the terminology is thus correct, it is evident that all correlatives are interdependent.
Of the lady's sensations they remained a little in doubt; but that the gentleman was overflowing with admiration was evident enough.
It was evident to him that he soon must die unless he tore loose from the steel fingers that were choking the life from him.
is established for some good purpose; for an apparent [Bekker 1252a] good is the spring of all human actions; it is evident that this is the principle upon which they are every one founded, and this is more especially true of that which has for its object the best possible, and is itself the most excellent, and comprehends all the rest.