exasperate

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Maybe if I had taken it to a dealer I would have been better off," White says exasperated.
When Diaghilev became exasperated with him for not delivering the score for the commissioned ballet The Firebird on time, he contacted twenty-eight-year-old Igor Stravinsky, who had already learned of the conflict and begun his own version.
I was both incensed and exasperated by this reaction: It's easy to recommend that people man the barricades when you know that you're nowhere near the front lines.
AN EXASPERATED CHARLES DE GAULLE once exclaimed: "How can you govern a country that has 246 kinds of cheese?
He walked away exasperated, and I drove away angry.
Quite apart from the pain of the survivors of residential schools, it has flowed throughout the church, touching all, from confused and saddened parishioners to exasperated General Synod staff to besieged bishops and clergy.
John Coplans provides a more irascible voice, irritated by the relentlessness of the monthly grind and exasperated by the ideological tug-of-war within the editorial board, riven as it was by "formalists" Annette Michelson and myself and sociopolitical contextualists Lawrence Alloway and Max Kozloff.
His reform efforts exasperated the colonial and English authorities; but for some inexplicable grace and his specific circumstances, he might otherwise have paid for his views in prison or on the gibbet.
Exhuming Tyler is the story of the personal crisis caused when this idiosyncratic, innocently ghoulish character is asked to move out by his brother's exasperated wife.
I was exasperated not only by details of format (at least 51 minor misprints; accents on Jehan Thenaud and Menestrier; a plethora of unnecessary and repetitive footnotes), but by the cramming of too much material into each chapter, so that before one interesting point can be sufficiently developed we have already jumped to the next one.
In the Broadway production of "My Fair Lady," an exasperated Rex Harrison became famous for lamenting: "Why can't a woman--be more like a man?
Two White Sox sources practically scoffed at the likelihood of this happening with one exasperated over the fact that anybody with a trade idea and an outlet to present it can cause a stir.