excitability


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Related to excitability: overwhelmingly, ho-hum, conductivity, conferred, waylaid
See: passion
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The subject of M1 excitability changes in only the early period of motor learning is disputable.
Concerning parameters related to excitability, the rheo-base and chronaxie values of control conditions were 3.
We suggest that these findings may be particularly important in understanding further the association between motor excitability and the occurrence of echophenomena in a wide range of clinical conditions.
In Tourette's syndrome, if we could reduce the excitability we might reduce the ticks, and that's what we are working on," he said.
He said: "We suggest that these findings may be particularly important in understanding further the association between motor excitability and the occurrence of echophenomena in a wide range of clinical conditions that have been linked to increased cortical excitability and/or decreased physiological inhibition such as epilepsy, dementia, autism, and Tourette syndrome.
In a post-stroke brain, the equilibrium of cortical excitability is altered, which shows a reduction in the cortical excitability of the ipsilesional hemisphere.
Dib-Hajj's research has centred on the molecular basis of excitability disorders in humans including pain, with a focus on the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in the pathophysiology of these disorders, and as targets for new therapeutics.
Comment: Omega-3 fatty acids inhibit neuronal excitability and reduce seizures in animal models of epilepsy.
In striking contrast, AVP suppresses network excitability when acting on V1aRs in the neonate hippocampus.
It can cause vomiting, excitability, changes to the heart and potentially seizures and kidney dysfunction.
Further experiments in wild-type mice showed that experimental lowering of BRCA1 levels in the dentate gyrus caused neuronal dysfunction and shrinkage, as well as impairments in synaptic plasticity, excessive neuronal excitability, spatial learning and memory deficits, and increased DNA damage.