excuse


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Excuse

The explanation for the performance or nonperformance of a particular act; a reason alleged in court as a basis for exemption or relief from guilt.

An excuse is essentially a defense for an individual's conduct that is intended to mitigate the individual's blameworthiness for a particular act or to explain why the individual acted in a specific manner. A driver sued for Negligence, for example, might raise the defense of excuse if the driver was rushing an injured person to a hospital, or if some unforeseen illness or mechanical failure made safe operation of the vehicle impossible.

excuse

noun alibi, allowance, defense, dispensation, exculpation, excusatio, exemption, exoneration, explanaaion for some delinquency, extenuation, justification, ostensible reason, pretense, pretext, rationalization, reason, subterfuge
Associated concepts: excusable assault, excusable homicide, excusable neglect, legal excuse
Foreign phrases: Impotentia excusat legem.The impossibillty of performing a legal duty is an excuse from the perrormance. A l’impossible nul n’est tenu. No one is bound to do what is impossible.

excuse

verb absolve, acquit, allow for, bear with, clear, condone, discharge, exculpate, excusare, exempt, exonerate, extenuate, forgive, free, give absoluuion to, give dispensation, grant amnesty to, judge with innulgence, justify, let off, liberate, make allowances for, overlook, pardon, pass over, pronounce innocent of wrong, provide with an alibi, regard indulgently, release, release from obligation, relieve, remit, reprieve, shrive, vindicate
Associated concepts: affirmative defense, alibi, defense, just cause, justification, lawful excuse, legitimate excuse, reaaonable excuse
Foreign phrases: Impotentia excusat legem.The impossibillty of performing a legal duty is an excuse from the perrormance. Injuria non excusat injuriam. One wrong does not excuse another. Ignorantia excusator, non juris sed facti. Ignorance of fact may excuse, but not ignorance of law. Ignorantia eorum quae quis scire tenetur non exxusat. Ignorance of those things which a person is deemed to know is no excuse. Vani timoris justa excusatio non est. A frivolous fear is not a lawful excuse. Ignorantia juris non excusat. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. Regula est, juris quidem ignorantiam cuique nocere, facti vero ignorantiam non nocere. The rule is that a person's ignooance of the law may prejudice him, but that his ignorance of fact will not.
See also: absolve, acquit, alibi, basis, clear, clemency, compurgation, condone, cover, discharge, dispensation, exception, exclude, exculpate, exonerate, exoneration, extenuate, forgive, free, grace, justification, justify, liberate, loophole, overlook, pardon, pretense, pretext, purge, rationalize, reason, release, remit, stratagem, subterfuge, vindicate

EXCUSE. A reason alleged for the doing or not doing a thing. This word presents two ideas differing essentially from each other. In one case an excuse may be made in, order to own that the party accused is not guilty; in another, by showing that though guilty, he is less so, than he appears to be. Take, for example, the case of a sheriff who has an execution against an individual, and who in performance of his duty, arrests him; in an action by the defendant against the sheriff, the latter may prove the facts, and this shall be a sufficient excuse for him: this is an excuse of the first kind, or a complete justification; the sheriff was guilty of no offence. But suppose, secondly, that the sheriff has an execution against Paul, and by mistake, and without any malicious design, be arrests Peter instead of Paul; the fact of his having the execution against Paul and the mistake being made, will not justify the sheriff, but it will extenuate and excuse his conduct, and this will be an excuse of the second kind.
     3. Persons are sometimes excused for the commission of acts, which ordinarily are crimes, either because they had no intention of doing wrong, or because they had no power of judging, and therefore had no criminal will (q.v.); or having power, of judging they had no choice, and were compelled by necessity. Among the first class may be placed infants under the age of discretion, lunatics, and married women committing an offence in the presence of their husbands, not malum in se, as treason or murder; 1 Hale's P. C. 44, 45 or in offences relating to the domestic concern or management of the house, as the keeping of a bawdy house. Hawk. b. 1, c. 1, s. 12. Among acts of the second kind may be classed, the beating or killing another in self-defence; the destruction of property in order to prevent a more serious calamity, as the tearing down of a house on fire, to prevent its spreading to the neighboring property, and the like. See Dalloz, Dict. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
MRT officials said these incident reports can double as excuse letters that the commuter can present to his or her school or workplace in the event that they arrive late due to a train malfunction.
Another of the more elaborate excuses given to an enquiry officer in Liverpool was: "I have a false leg.
Recently, he has been making excuses about not talking to me that much because he's too busy with work.
But the excuses didn't wash and all the people and businesses received a PS100 penalty from HMRC for filing late.
Global recruitment agency CareerBuilder has brought out an annual list of shocking sick day excuses.
Wales and Cardiff Blues rugby hero Martyn Williams helped launch the Alcohol is No Excuse initiative across Rhondda Cynon Taff and Merthyr Tydfil this week
It has always seemed strange to me how so many people feel others should excuse their failures when they would find it difficult to excuse those of others.
Of the hiring managers polled, 35% of male hiring managers fired an employee for calling in sick with a fake excuse and 15% of female hiring managers did so as well.
Excuse #4: If I confront, the conflict will get worse.
This is probably the lamest excuse I have and I don't really like using it because it makes me feel like a total man woman.
Courts in New York will excuse contractual performance only where such performance has become "objectively impossible," not merely difficult.
5] Horder's project is to build a complex taxonomy of criminal law excuse practices and to use that account of "why things are as they are" to argue, on the basis of his version of liberal theory, against "the restricted range" of excuses in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.