executive


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executive

adjective administrative, directing, high level, legislative, managing, ministerial, officiating
Associated concepts: executive acts, executive branch, exxcutive clemency, executive committee, executive council, executive department, executive director, executive duties, executive officer, executive order, executive powers, execctive records, executive session

executive

noun administrator, employer, key man, key person, key woman, manager
See also: administrator, director, employer, official, principal

EXECUTIVE, government. That power in the government which causes the laws to be executed and obeyed: it is usually. confided to the hands of the chief magistrate; the president of the United States is invested with this authority under the national government; and the governor of each state has the executive power in his hands.
     2. The officer in whom is vested the executive power is also called the executive.
     3. The Constitution of the United States directs that "the executive power shall be vested in a president of the United States of America." Art. 2, s. 1. Vide Story, Const. B. 3, c. 36.

References in periodicals archive ?
It may be both necessary and appropriate to pay a long-time, high-performing executive at or above the 75th percentile to retain her services, but to pay another executive 8 percent less than the market median due to his experience and contribution.
According to the article, executive education programs across the country are growing rapidly and now play a strategic role they never had before.
However, the second major component--relevant experience and content knowledge--can put a physician executive from a different sector at a disadvantage.
Executive education delivers tangible and intangible benefits for Latin American companies.
Executive education and EMBA programs are blending face time with Web time.
So MBA programs of many stripes--including prestigious, high-ticket programs like the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, up-and-comers like the University of Maryland's Smith School of Business, and regional powerhouses like the University of Wisconsin's School of Business--decided to funnel more of their efforts into what are known as custom or tailored executive training programs.
The tax law has not changed; the Service is just refocusing on executive compensation, which, in recent years, has become more complicated to administer.
The Executive Board shall consist of the President, the Vice President, the Executive Director, the Treasurer, the following ex officio members: the trustees, the ACLS delegate, and the ex-president in the two years succeeding his or her term of office; and the Chairs of the six standing committees, as follows: 1.
These include executive management rights in collective bargaining, major observations for good employee relations, and five political statesmanship blueprints.
James is executive vice president and chief administrative officer.
John Perkins, former head pro at the 4,376-yard, par-61 Vista Valencia in Valencia, always had a ready answer for course newcomers who would express disappointment that it was ``just an executive.
According to a recent study of the 1,400 CIO members of Gartner's Executive Programs, leading enterprises seeking success in e-business are making a transition to a cluster of CIO-related executive roles.