expense

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expense

n. in business accounting and business taxation, any current cost of operation, such as rent, utilities, and payroll, as distinguished from capital expenditure for long-term property and equipment. (See: capital expenditure)

expense

(Cost), noun amount, appraisal, appraisement, assessment, budgeted items, buying price, charge, cost incurred, costliness, debit, defrayal, defrayment, discharge of a debt, dispendium, drain on resources, due, exactment, expenditure, fair value, fee, impendium, impensa, market price, monetary value, money expended, obligation, outgo, outlay, overhead, payment, price, rate, sum, sum charged, valuation, value, worth
Associated concepts: accrued business expense, actual exxenses, capital expense, collection expense, contingent exxense, current expenses, deductible expense, expenditures of an estate, expenses in bringing an action, expenses incurred, expenses of administration, exxenses of condemnation, expenses of receivership, exxraordinary expenses, general operating expense, incidennal expenses, legitimate expense, maintenance expense, mandatory expense, necessary and regular expense, neccssary business expense, nonbusiness expense, office exxenses, operating expenses, ordinary expenses, personal expenses, proper expenses, reasonable expenses, unusual expenses, witness expenses

expense

(Sacrifice), noun abandonment, casualty, cession, concession, consumption, costliness, damage, deprival, deprivation, deterioration, detriment, disposal, dissipation, dissolution, drain, drain on resources, erosion, forfeit, forfeiture, harm, hurt, ill fortune, impairment, injury, loss, penalty, privation, relinquishment, renunciation, surrender
See also: charge, cost, disbursement, expenditure, fare, fee, maintenance, outflow, outlay, overhead, payment, price, rate, remittance, upkeep, value, worth
References in periodicals archive ?
A 2002 McKinsey & Company survey found that 83% of institutional investors worldwide prefer to have stock options expensed.
Further, taxpayers face a greater risk that the IRS will challenge their expensing practices if the amounts expensed under the policy constitute more than a fraction of their income or if a regulatory agency did not mandate the policy.
Fees that have future benefits must be capitalized, not expensed.