expression

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expression

(Comment), noun articulation, asseveration, cliché, communication, declaration, expressed opinion, formula, formulation, idiom, locution, maxim, mention, motto, profession, representation in language, saying, sententia, set phrase, setting forth in words, statement, verbalism, vocal embodiment of thought, voicing, vox
Associated concepts: construction, interpretation
Foreign phrases: Expressio unius est exclusio alterius.The expression of one thing is the exclusion of another.

expression

(Manifestation), noun appearance, disclosure, display, emergence, evidence, exhibit, exhibition, exposition, exposure, illustration, indication, instance, mark, presentation, presentment, revelation, show, showing, sign, token, uncovering
See also: admission, assertion, call, comment, connotation, creation, declaration, demeanor, disclosure, inflection, language, manifestation, maxim, mention, parlance, phraseology, pronouncement, reference, remark, rhetoric, speech, style, testimony, title, token

expression

declaring or signifying. Freedom of expression is a HUMAN RIGHT.

EXPRESSION. The term or use of language employed to explain a thing.
     2. It is a general rule, that expressions shall be construed, when they are capable of several significations, so as to give operation to the agreement, act, or will, if it can be done; and an expression is always to be understood in the sense most agreeable to the nature of the contract. Vide Clause; Construction; Equivocal; Interpretation; Words.

References in periodicals archive ?
Though wearing the same haircut and world-weary expressionlessness as those in the paintings, these women - often accompanied by comic-style narration - are rapid-fire depictions of womanhood's mundane absurdities.
The flatness of the recitation in Cytter's works, along with the fact that each actor speaks his or her lines with his or her own particular accent--German, Israeli, Indian, American, or whatever--and with suitably nonidiomatic phrasing, allows for the overwrought emotion of the lines to come through purely, without interpretation, in an ecstasy of expressionlessness, and at the same time for the formal literalism of the situation of performance to emerge as an object of interest in its own right.