expunge

(redirected from expunging)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.
Related to expunging: expunction

Expunge

To destroy; blot out; obliterate; erase; efface designedly; strike out wholly. The act of physically destroying information—including criminal records—in files, computers, or other depositories.

expunge

verb abrade, annul, black out, blot out, cannel, cause to disappear, censor, cross off, cross out, delere, delete, destroy, dispose of, do away with, edit out, efface, eradicate, erase, excise, extinguish, extirpate, inducere, leave no trace, nullify, obliterate, oblitterare, put an end to, quash, quell, raze, remove, remove all sign of, remove all trace of, render illegible, rub out, scratch out, strike out, take out, wipe away, wipe off, wipe out
Associated concepts: expunge the record
See also: annul, bowdlerize, cancel, censor, delete, destroy, edit, efface, eliminate, eradicate, excise, expurgate, extinguish, obliterate, redact, remove, revoke
References in periodicals archive ?
82) The statutes governing both record sealing and expunging contain a
In the case of an executive pardon in Illinois, "the presiding trial judge at the defendant's trial, [may] have a court order entered expunging the record of arrest from the official records.
c) Whenever a person who has been convicted of an offense is granted a pardon by the governor which specifically authorizes expungement, he may, upon verified petition to the chief judge of the circuit where the person had been convicted, any judge of the circuit designated by the Chief Judge, or in counties of less than 3,000,000 inhabitants, the presiding trial judge at the defendant's trial, may have a court order entered expunging the record of arrest from the official records.
He also said the keeping of such fingerprints by the government, which is now in the process of expunging them, is not illegal.
After expunging several moderates from key leadership positions in several state Republican conventions beginning in 1994, as well as contributing to the landslide victory of Republicans in the November 1994 elections, the Christian Coalition has emerged in 1996 as the dominant and most influential lobbying group in the Republican Party--and arguably the most influential in American politics today.
You're about to tell me that you can therefore take any constitutional clause and argue coherently both for and against expunging it.