expurgated


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Related to expurgated: unexpurgated

expurgated

adjective  censored, cleansed, diminished, disinfected, edited, excluded, pure, purged, purified, refined
See also: pure
References in periodicals archive ?
Elegantly transitioning to other "invisible men--and women," "Chapter Five: 1950" probes the inclusion of sexual relationships in the expurgated drafts of Invisible Man (144).
Furthermore there would have been ways of avoiding disclosure of the source of the leak that would not have required the release of an expurgated version of the document.
Despite his objections to expurgation, Whitman had a hand in, or at least approved, four different expurgated editions of Leaves of Grass.
Both of these examples come from expurgated portions of letters printed previously.
It is quite right that some details have been expurgated.
Coldiron quotes from the French originals to demonstrate how the translators freely adapted, expurgated and added to the story.
The saga of the Bronfmans--their rise to wealth on profits from illicit liquor trade to the United States during the 1920s Prohibition era, the bitter internecine family feuds, and the abrupt collapse of what had become an "entertainment empire" after Seagram's merger with Vivendi in December 2000--has often been told, in expurgated versions sanctioned by the family; in various popular exposes of the shady origins of their wealth and battles for control of the company; and even in novels.
Virilio explains: "When the control room puts through images of violence, sex and gore, the current affairs reporters are required to comment on them in expurgated language, in order not to offend or deter any category of listeners, any (economic, racial, clinical, sexual, etc.
This sugar-coated picture gives the book an expurgated feel.
This strategy succeeded with the most crucial of its audiences: of all the mystical texts written throughout the Golden Age, the Tercer abecedario espiritual was one that was never censored, expurgated or altered in any way by the Inquisition, even in the more ideologically rigorous climate following the Council of Trent (1545-63).
Alibech's tale was expurgated from the Decameron, and the nun did public penance.
Textual instability entails the manner in which "texts are not immune from the flow of history," Cohen writes, as well as the ways in which "they are composed, revised, expurgated, improved, defaced, restored, emended, and circulated as a matter of course" (1997, xxii).