extort

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Related to extorts: extortionist

Extort

To compel or coerce, as in a confession or information, by any means serving to overcome the other's power of resistance, thus making the confession or admission involuntary. To gain by wrongful methods; to obtain in an unlawful manner, as in to compel payments by means of threats of injury to person, property, or reputation. To exact something wrongfully by threatening or putting in fear. The natural meaning of the word extort is to obtain money or other valuable things by compulsion, by actual force, or by the force of motives applied to the will, and often more overpowering and irresistible than physical force.

extort

verb blackmail, coerce, compel, compel by innimidation, compel by threat, constrain by force, draw out by compulsion, draw out by force, elicit by threat, exact, exact by force, exprimere, extorquere, force, gain by wrongful methhds, gain wrongfully, obtain by compulsion, obtain in an unnawful manner, obtain unlawfully, victimize, wrest, wring
Associated concepts: kidnapping
Foreign phrases: Accipere quid ut justitiam facias, non est tam accipere quam extorquere.The acceptance of anything as a reward for doing justice is extorting rather than accepting.
See also: acquire, coerce, constrain, deprive, enforce, exact, force, impose, press, prey, secure, toll
References in classic literature ?
Throughout dinner he took a dry delight in making Sarah Pocket greener and yellower, by often referring in conversation with me to my expectations; but here, again, he showed no consciousness, and even made it appear that he extorted - and even did extort, though I don't know how - those references out of my innocent self.
Stand up, Isaac, and hearken to me,'' said the Palmer, who viewed the extremity of his distress with a compassion in which contempt was largely mingled; ``you have cause for your terror, considering how your brethren have been used, in order to extort from them their hoards, both by princes and nobles; but stand up, I say, and I will point out to you the means of escape.
She did at last extort from her father an acknowledgment that the horses were engaged; Jane was therefore obliged to go on horseback, and her mother attended her to the door with many cheerful prognostics of a bad day.